Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorClerc, N.en
dc.contributor.authorMerloni, A.en
dc.contributor.authorZhang, Y.-Y.en
dc.contributor.authorFinoguenov, A.en
dc.contributor.authorDwelly, T.en
dc.contributor.authorNandra, K.en
dc.contributor.authorCollins, C.en
dc.contributor.authorDawson, K.en
dc.contributor.authorKneib, J.-P.en
dc.contributor.authorRozo, E.en
dc.contributor.authorRykoff, E.en
dc.contributor.authorSadibekova, T.en
dc.contributor.authorBrownstein, J.en
dc.contributor.authorLin, Y.-T.en
dc.contributor.authorRidl, J.en
dc.contributor.authorSalvato, M.en
dc.contributor.authorSchwope, A.en
dc.contributor.authorSteinmetz, M.en
dc.contributor.authorSeo, H.-J.en
dc.contributor.authorTinker, J.en
dc.date.accessioned2017-03-30T00:46:52Z
dc.date.available2017-03-30T00:46:52Z
dc.date.issued2016-12-21
dc.identifier.citationSPIDERS: the spectroscopic follow-up of X-ray-selected clusters of galaxies in SDSS-IV 2016, 463 (4):4490 Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Societyen
dc.identifier.issn0035-8711
dc.identifier.issn1365-2966
dc.identifier.doi10.1093/mnras/stw2214
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/622920
dc.description.abstractSPIDERS (The SPectroscopic IDentification of eROSITA Sources) is a programme dedicated to the homogeneous and complete spectroscopic follow-up of X-ray active galactic nuclei and galaxy clusters over a large area (similar to 7500 deg(2)) of the extragalactic sky. SPIDERS is part of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS)-IV project, together with the Extended Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey and the Time-Domain Spectroscopic Survey. This paper describes the largest project within SPIDERS before the launch of eROSITA: an optical spectroscopic survey of X-ray-selected, massive (similar to 10(14)-10(15) M-circle dot) galaxy clusters discovered in ROSAT and XMM-Newton imaging. The immediate aim is to determine precise (Delta(z) similar to 0.001) redshifts for 4000-5000 of these systems out to z similar to 0.6. The scientific goal of the program is precision cosmology, using clusters as probes of large-scale structure in the expanding Universe. We present the cluster samples, target selection algorithms and observation strategies. We demonstrate the efficiency of selecting targets using a combination of SDSS imaging data, a robust red-sequence finder and a dedicated prioritization scheme. We describe a set of algorithms and work-flow developed to collate spectra and assign cluster membership, and to deliver catalogues of spectroscopically confirmed clusters. We discuss the relevance of line-of-sight velocity dispersion estimators for the richer systems. We illustrate our techniques by constructing a catalogue of 230 spectroscopically validated clusters (0.031 < z < 0.658), found in pilot observations. We discuss two potential science applications of the SPIDERS sample: the study of the X-ray luminosity-velocity dispersion (L-X-sigma) relation and the building of stacked phase-space diagrams.
dc.description.sponsorshipAlfred P. Sloan Foundation; US Department of Energy Office of Science; Center for High-Performance Computing at the University of Utah; Brazilian Participation Group; Carnegie Institution for Science; Carnegie Mellon University; Chilean Participation Group; French Participation Group; Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics; Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias; Johns Hopkins University; Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (IPMU)/University of Tokyo; Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory; Leibniz Institut fur Astrophysik Potsdam (AIP); Max-Planck-Institut fur Astronomie (MPIA Heidelberg); Max-Planck-Institut fur Astrophysik (MPA Garching); Max-Planck-Institut fur Extraterrestrische Physik (MPE); National Astronomical Observatory of China; New Mexico State University; New York University; University of Notre Dame; Observatario Nacional/MCTI; Ohio State University; Pennsylvania State University; Shanghai Astronomical Observatory; United Kingdom Participation Group; Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico; University of Arizona; University of Colorado Boulder; University of Oxford; University of Portsmouth; University of Utah; University of Virginia; University of Washington; University of Wisconsin; Vanderbilt University; Yale University; German BMWI through the Verbundforschung [50 OR 1506]; National Science Foundationen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherOXFORD UNIV PRESSen
dc.relation.urlhttps://academic.oup.com/mnras/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/mnras/stw2214en
dc.rights© 2016 The Authors Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Royal Astronomical Societyen
dc.subjectcataloguesen
dc.subjectgalaxies: clusters: generalen
dc.subjectcosmology: observationsen
dc.subjectX-rays: galaxies: clustersen
dc.titleSPIDERS: the spectroscopic follow-up of X-ray-selected clusters of galaxies in SDSS-IVen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Arizona, Dept Physen
dc.identifier.journalMonthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Societyen
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en
dc.eprint.versionFinal published versionen
refterms.dateFOA2018-08-18T03:25:18Z
html.description.abstractSPIDERS (The SPectroscopic IDentification of eROSITA Sources) is a programme dedicated to the homogeneous and complete spectroscopic follow-up of X-ray active galactic nuclei and galaxy clusters over a large area (similar to 7500 deg(2)) of the extragalactic sky. SPIDERS is part of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS)-IV project, together with the Extended Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey and the Time-Domain Spectroscopic Survey. This paper describes the largest project within SPIDERS before the launch of eROSITA: an optical spectroscopic survey of X-ray-selected, massive (similar to 10(14)-10(15) M-circle dot) galaxy clusters discovered in ROSAT and XMM-Newton imaging. The immediate aim is to determine precise (Delta(z) similar to 0.001) redshifts for 4000-5000 of these systems out to z similar to 0.6. The scientific goal of the program is precision cosmology, using clusters as probes of large-scale structure in the expanding Universe. We present the cluster samples, target selection algorithms and observation strategies. We demonstrate the efficiency of selecting targets using a combination of SDSS imaging data, a robust red-sequence finder and a dedicated prioritization scheme. We describe a set of algorithms and work-flow developed to collate spectra and assign cluster membership, and to deliver catalogues of spectroscopically confirmed clusters. We discuss the relevance of line-of-sight velocity dispersion estimators for the richer systems. We illustrate our techniques by constructing a catalogue of 230 spectroscopically validated clusters (0.031 < z < 0.658), found in pilot observations. We discuss two potential science applications of the SPIDERS sample: the study of the X-ray luminosity-velocity dispersion (L-X-sigma) relation and the building of stacked phase-space diagrams.


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Name:
stw2214.pdf
Size:
12.64Mb
Format:
PDF
Description:
FInal Published Version

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record