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dc.contributor.advisorRitter, Leslieen
dc.contributor.authorSallee, Katherineen
dc.creatorSallee, Katherineen
dc.date.accessioned2017-03-30T18:40:08Z
dc.date.available2017-03-30T18:40:08Z
dc.date.issued2016
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/622934
dc.description.abstractPurpose: Many patients suffer from depression after a stroke. The aims of this feasibility study were to: examine the recruitment process of community dwelling stroke survivors in a study using an interactive computer program (Cognues®), determine the ability to assess cognitive function and depression status in subjects using Cognuse® and ascertain the usability of the Cognuse® program from the perspective of eight study participants. Methods: Stroke survivors in two community support groups and personal contact referrals were provided a research flyer and study synopsis, including background and study participation explanation. Eight stroke survivors agreed to take part in study. Each participant completed a depression and cognitive scale, three weeks of online computer exercises assigned by the PI, then a post-exercise depression and cognitive scale and a usability survey. Results: Recruitment was difficult; the proposed number (8-10) of stroke survivors was successfully fulfilled over a 6 month time period. Of the eight consented subjects, seven completed the study with one lost to follow-up. Pre- and -post depression and cognitive scales were compared and analyzed. Half of the participants showed a small increase in cognitive function and showed a significant positive change after completion of the online exercises. Usability of the Cognuse® program was overall perceived in a neutral capacity by the participants and although the subjects liked the idea of the program, it was not as user friendly as expected. Conclusion: Recruitment of community dwelling stroke survivors is feasible for a study using an online computer exercise program to determine emotional health. However, the usability of the selected program was determined to be neutral; participants liked the idea of the program but found there were many limitations. Upon completion of the three week online exercises, subjects showed an increase in cognitive function and slight decrease in depressive symptoms, illustrating a possible link between cognitive function and depression.
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.subjectDepressionen
dc.subjectStrokeen
dc.subjectCognuseen
dc.titleFeasibility of Using a Novel and Interactive Computer Program to Assess Emotional Health After a Strokeen_US
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen
dc.contributor.committeememberRitter, Leslieen
dc.contributor.committeememberBadger, Terryen
dc.contributor.committeememberMcArthur, Donnaen
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen
thesis.degree.disciplineNursingen
thesis.degree.nameD.N.P.en
refterms.dateFOA2018-05-27T15:51:39Z
html.description.abstractPurpose: Many patients suffer from depression after a stroke. The aims of this feasibility study were to: examine the recruitment process of community dwelling stroke survivors in a study using an interactive computer program (Cognues®), determine the ability to assess cognitive function and depression status in subjects using Cognuse® and ascertain the usability of the Cognuse® program from the perspective of eight study participants. Methods: Stroke survivors in two community support groups and personal contact referrals were provided a research flyer and study synopsis, including background and study participation explanation. Eight stroke survivors agreed to take part in study. Each participant completed a depression and cognitive scale, three weeks of online computer exercises assigned by the PI, then a post-exercise depression and cognitive scale and a usability survey. Results: Recruitment was difficult; the proposed number (8-10) of stroke survivors was successfully fulfilled over a 6 month time period. Of the eight consented subjects, seven completed the study with one lost to follow-up. Pre- and -post depression and cognitive scales were compared and analyzed. Half of the participants showed a small increase in cognitive function and showed a significant positive change after completion of the online exercises. Usability of the Cognuse® program was overall perceived in a neutral capacity by the participants and although the subjects liked the idea of the program, it was not as user friendly as expected. Conclusion: Recruitment of community dwelling stroke survivors is feasible for a study using an online computer exercise program to determine emotional health. However, the usability of the selected program was determined to be neutral; participants liked the idea of the program but found there were many limitations. Upon completion of the three week online exercises, subjects showed an increase in cognitive function and slight decrease in depressive symptoms, illustrating a possible link between cognitive function and depression.


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