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dc.contributor.authorFerng, Alice S.
dc.contributor.authorSchipper, David
dc.contributor.authorConnell, Alana M.
dc.contributor.authorMarsh, Katherine M.
dc.contributor.authorKnapp, Shannon
dc.contributor.authorKhalpey, Zain
dc.date.accessioned2017-03-31T00:21:54Z
dc.date.available2017-03-31T00:21:54Z
dc.date.issued2017-01-26
dc.identifier.citationNovel vs clinical organ preservation solutions: improved cardiac mitochondrial protection 2017, 12 (1) Journal of Cardiothoracic Surgeryen
dc.identifier.issn1749-8090
dc.identifier.pmid28126002
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/s13019-017-0564-x
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/622950
dc.description.abstractBackground: Heart transplantation remains the gold standard for end-stage heart failure, with current ex vivo organ storage times limited to 4 to 6 h before critical tissue damage occurs. Many preservation solutions exist in an attempt to limit both ischemic and reperfusion damage. In order to compare the effects of various storage solutions, mitochondrial function can be used to provide a sensitive analysis of cellular metabolic function. Methods: Experimental plates were seeded with cardiac myoblasts and kept in suspended animation for either 4 or 8 h at either 4(o) or 21 degrees C, in Celsior (R), Perfadex (R), or Somah storage solutions. Cells were then reanimated for 1 h at 37 degrees C to simulate a reperfusion or clinical transplant scenario. Cellular bioenergetics were measured immediately thereafter to examine biochemical differences between preservation solutions and their effectiveness on preserving metabolic function. Results: The oxygen consumption rates of Somah solution were significantly higher than Celsior (R) and Perfadex (R) at 4 degrees C, with the exception of Perfadex (R) at 4(o) for 4 h. This effect was sustained up to 8 h. At 21 degrees C, oxygen consumption rates of Somah solution are significantly higher than Celsior (R) and Perfadex (R) at basal conditions after 4 h, but this effect is not sustained after 8 h. Conclusions: The purpose of this experiment was to study the efficacy of various preservation solutions on a mitochondrial level. The significantly higher oxygen consumption rates of Somah at 4 degrees C suggests that Somah solution may have the ability to protect cellular mitochondrial integrity, improve transplanted organ function by reducing ischemic-reperfusion injury, and thereby improve transplant outcomes. Given that Somah offers benefits over Celsior (R) and Perfadex (R) at 4 degrees C, it should be a target in future organ preservation solution research.
dc.description.sponsorshipPolish-US Fulbright Commissionen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherBIOMED CENTRAL LTDen
dc.relation.urlhttp://cardiothoracicsurgery.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s13019-017-0564-xen
dc.rights© The Author(s). 2017 Open Access This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0en
dc.subjectOrgan preservation solutionen
dc.subjectCardiac myoblastsen
dc.subjectMitochondriaen
dc.subjectBioenergeticsen
dc.subjectSomahen
dc.subjectCelsioren
dc.subjectPerfadexen
dc.titleNovel vs clinical organ preservation solutions: improved cardiac mitochondrial protectionen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Arizona, Coll Med, Dept Surg, Div Cardiothorac Surgen
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Arizona, Coll Med, Dept Physiol Scien
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Arizona, Coll Med, Dept Biomed Engnen
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Arizona, Coll Meden
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Arizona, Coll Med, BIOS Inst, Stat Consulting Laben
dc.identifier.journalJournal of Cardiothoracic Surgeryen
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en
dc.eprint.versionFinal published versionen
refterms.dateFOA2018-09-11T18:13:17Z
html.description.abstractBackground: Heart transplantation remains the gold standard for end-stage heart failure, with current ex vivo organ storage times limited to 4 to 6 h before critical tissue damage occurs. Many preservation solutions exist in an attempt to limit both ischemic and reperfusion damage. In order to compare the effects of various storage solutions, mitochondrial function can be used to provide a sensitive analysis of cellular metabolic function. Methods: Experimental plates were seeded with cardiac myoblasts and kept in suspended animation for either 4 or 8 h at either 4(o) or 21 degrees C, in Celsior (R), Perfadex (R), or Somah storage solutions. Cells were then reanimated for 1 h at 37 degrees C to simulate a reperfusion or clinical transplant scenario. Cellular bioenergetics were measured immediately thereafter to examine biochemical differences between preservation solutions and their effectiveness on preserving metabolic function. Results: The oxygen consumption rates of Somah solution were significantly higher than Celsior (R) and Perfadex (R) at 4 degrees C, with the exception of Perfadex (R) at 4(o) for 4 h. This effect was sustained up to 8 h. At 21 degrees C, oxygen consumption rates of Somah solution are significantly higher than Celsior (R) and Perfadex (R) at basal conditions after 4 h, but this effect is not sustained after 8 h. Conclusions: The purpose of this experiment was to study the efficacy of various preservation solutions on a mitochondrial level. The significantly higher oxygen consumption rates of Somah at 4 degrees C suggests that Somah solution may have the ability to protect cellular mitochondrial integrity, improve transplanted organ function by reducing ischemic-reperfusion injury, and thereby improve transplant outcomes. Given that Somah offers benefits over Celsior (R) and Perfadex (R) at 4 degrees C, it should be a target in future organ preservation solution research.


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