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dc.contributor.authorFresco, David M.
dc.contributor.authorRoy, Amy K.
dc.contributor.authorAdelsberg, Samantha
dc.contributor.authorSeeley, Saren
dc.contributor.authorGarcía-Lesy, Emmanuel
dc.contributor.authorListon, Conor
dc.contributor.authorMennin, Douglas S.
dc.date.accessioned2017-04-04T20:34:20Z
dc.date.available2017-04-04T20:34:20Z
dc.date.issued2017-03-03
dc.identifier.citationDistinct Functional Connectivities Predict Clinical Response with Emotion Regulation Therapy 2017, 11 Frontiers in Human Neuroscienceen
dc.identifier.issn1662-5161
dc.identifier.pmid28316567
dc.identifier.doi10.3389/fnhum.2017.00086
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/623000
dc.description.abstractDespite the success of available medical and psychosocial treatments, a sizable subgroup of individuals with commonly co-occurring disorders, generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) and major depressive disorder (MDD), fail to make sufficient treatment gains thereby prolonging their deficits in life functioning and satisfaction. Clinically, these patients often display temperamental features reflecting heightened sensitivity to underlying motivational systems related to threat/safety and reward/loss (e.g., somatic anxiety) as well as inordinate negative self-referential processing (e.g., worry, rumination). This profile may reflect disruption in two important neural networks associated with emotional/motivational salience (e.g., salience network) and self-referentiality (e.g., default network, DN). Emotion Regulation Therapy (ERT) was developed to target this hypothesized profile and its neurobehavioral markers. In the present study, 22 GAD patients (with and without MDD) completed resting state MRI scans before receiving 16 sessions of ERT. To test study these hypotheses, we examined the associations between baseline patterns of intrinsic functional connectivity (iFC) of the insula and of hubs within the DN (anterior and dorsal medial prefrontal cortex [MPFC] and posterior cingulate cortex [PCC]) and treatment-related changes in worry, somatic anxiety symptoms and decentering. Results suggest that greater treatment linked reductions in worry were associated with iFC clusters in both the insular and parietal cortices. Greater treatment linked gains in decentering, a metacognitive process that involves the capacity to observe items that arise in the mind with healthy psychological distance that is targeted by ERT, was associated with iFC clusters in the anterior and posterior DN. The current study adds to the growing body of research implicating disruptions in the default and salience networks as promising targets of treatment for GAD with and without co-occurring MDD.
dc.description.sponsorshipCUNY Collaborative Incentive Research Grant (CIRG) [2054]; PSC-CUNY Enhanced Research Award [65797-0043]; National Institutes of Health (NIH) MBRS-RISE Program at Hunter College [GM060665]; Doctoral Student Research Grant, City University of New York, Graduate Center; NIH [1R01HL119977-01, 1P30NR015326-01]en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherFRONTIERS MEDIA SAen
dc.relation.urlhttp://journal.frontiersin.org/article/10.3389/fnhum.2017.00086/fullen
dc.rights© 2017 Fresco, Roy, Adelsberg, Seeley, García-Lesy, Liston and Mennin. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY).en
dc.subjectgeneralized anxiety disorderen
dc.subjectmajor depressive disorderen
dc.subjectworryen
dc.subjectsomatic anxietyen
dc.subjectdecenteringen
dc.subjectresting state functional connectivityen
dc.titleDistinct Functional Connectivities Predict Clinical Response with Emotion Regulation Therapyen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Arizona, Dept Psycholen
dc.identifier.journalFrontiers in Human Neuroscienceen
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en
dc.eprint.versionFinal published versionen
refterms.dateFOA2018-08-14T07:47:12Z
html.description.abstractDespite the success of available medical and psychosocial treatments, a sizable subgroup of individuals with commonly co-occurring disorders, generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) and major depressive disorder (MDD), fail to make sufficient treatment gains thereby prolonging their deficits in life functioning and satisfaction. Clinically, these patients often display temperamental features reflecting heightened sensitivity to underlying motivational systems related to threat/safety and reward/loss (e.g., somatic anxiety) as well as inordinate negative self-referential processing (e.g., worry, rumination). This profile may reflect disruption in two important neural networks associated with emotional/motivational salience (e.g., salience network) and self-referentiality (e.g., default network, DN). Emotion Regulation Therapy (ERT) was developed to target this hypothesized profile and its neurobehavioral markers. In the present study, 22 GAD patients (with and without MDD) completed resting state MRI scans before receiving 16 sessions of ERT. To test study these hypotheses, we examined the associations between baseline patterns of intrinsic functional connectivity (iFC) of the insula and of hubs within the DN (anterior and dorsal medial prefrontal cortex [MPFC] and posterior cingulate cortex [PCC]) and treatment-related changes in worry, somatic anxiety symptoms and decentering. Results suggest that greater treatment linked reductions in worry were associated with iFC clusters in both the insular and parietal cortices. Greater treatment linked gains in decentering, a metacognitive process that involves the capacity to observe items that arise in the mind with healthy psychological distance that is targeted by ERT, was associated with iFC clusters in the anterior and posterior DN. The current study adds to the growing body of research implicating disruptions in the default and salience networks as promising targets of treatment for GAD with and without co-occurring MDD.


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