Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorSori, Michael M.
dc.contributor.authorByrne, Shane
dc.contributor.authorBland, Michael T.
dc.contributor.authorBramson, A. M.
dc.contributor.authorErmakov, Anton I.
dc.contributor.authorHamilton, Christopher W.
dc.contributor.authorOtto, Katharina A.
dc.contributor.authorRuesch, Ottaviano
dc.contributor.authorRussell, C. T.
dc.date.accessioned2017-04-05T21:36:48Z
dc.date.available2017-04-05T21:36:48Z
dc.date.issued2017-02-16
dc.identifier.citationThe vanishing cryovolcanoes of Ceres 2017, 44 (3):1243 Geophysical Research Lettersen
dc.identifier.issn00948276
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/2016GL072319
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/623032
dc.description.abstractAhuna Mons is a 4 km tall mountain on Ceres interpreted as a geologically young cryovolcanic dome. Other possible cryovolcanic features are more ambiguous, implying that cryovolcanism is only a recent phenomenon or that other cryovolcanic structures have been modified beyond easy identification. We test the hypothesis that Cerean cryovolcanic domes viscously relax, precluding ancient domes from recognition. We use numerical models to predict flow velocities of Ahuna Mons to be 10-500 m/Myr, depending upon assumptions about ice content, rheology, grain size, and thermal parameters. Slower flow rates in this range are sufficiently fast to induce extensive relaxation of cryovolcanic structures over 10(8)-10(9) years, but gradual enough for Ahuna Mons to remain identifiable today. Positive topographic features, including a tholus underlying Ahuna Mons, may represent relaxed cryovolcanic structures. A composition for Ahuna Mons of >40% ice explains the observed distribution of cryovolcanic structures because viscous relaxation renders old cryovolcanoes unrecognizable.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherAMER GEOPHYSICAL UNIONen
dc.relation.urlhttp://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2016GL072319en
dc.rights©2017. American Geophysical Union. All Rights Reserved.en
dc.subjectCeresen
dc.subjectcryovolcanismen
dc.subjectDawnen
dc.subjectviscous flowen
dc.subjectthermal modelingen
dc.titleThe vanishing cryovolcanoes of Ceresen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Arizona, Lunar & Planetary Laben
dc.identifier.journalGeophysical Research Lettersen
dc.description.note6 month embargo; First published: 10 February 2017en
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en
dc.eprint.versionFinal published versionen
dc.contributor.institutionLunar and Planetary Laboratory; University of Arizona; Tucson Arizona USA
dc.contributor.institutionLunar and Planetary Laboratory; University of Arizona; Tucson Arizona USA
dc.contributor.institutionU. S. Geological Survey Astrogeology Science Center; Flagstaff Arizona USA
dc.contributor.institutionLunar and Planetary Laboratory; University of Arizona; Tucson Arizona USA
dc.contributor.institutionJet Propulsion Laboratory; California Institute of Technology; Pasadena California USA
dc.contributor.institutionLunar and Planetary Laboratory; University of Arizona; Tucson Arizona USA
dc.contributor.institutionGerman Aerospace Center (DLR); Berlin Germany
dc.contributor.institutionNASA Goddard Space Flight Center/Universities Space Research Association; Greenbelt Maryland USA
dc.contributor.institutionEarth Planetary and Space Sciences; University of California; Los Angeles California USA
refterms.dateFOA0017-10-11T00:00:00Z
html.description.abstractAhuna Mons is a 4 km tall mountain on Ceres interpreted as a geologically young cryovolcanic dome. Other possible cryovolcanic features are more ambiguous, implying that cryovolcanism is only a recent phenomenon or that other cryovolcanic structures have been modified beyond easy identification. We test the hypothesis that Cerean cryovolcanic domes viscously relax, precluding ancient domes from recognition. We use numerical models to predict flow velocities of Ahuna Mons to be 10-500 m/Myr, depending upon assumptions about ice content, rheology, grain size, and thermal parameters. Slower flow rates in this range are sufficiently fast to induce extensive relaxation of cryovolcanic structures over 10(8)-10(9) years, but gradual enough for Ahuna Mons to remain identifiable today. Positive topographic features, including a tholus underlying Ahuna Mons, may represent relaxed cryovolcanic structures. A composition for Ahuna Mons of >40% ice explains the observed distribution of cryovolcanic structures because viscous relaxation renders old cryovolcanoes unrecognizable.


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Name:
Sori_et_al-2017-Geophysical_Re ...
Size:
735.8Kb
Format:
PDF
Description:
Final Published Version

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record