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dc.contributor.authorElliott, Thomas Alan
dc.contributor.authorAmenta, Edwin
dc.contributor.authorCaren, Neal
dc.date.accessioned2017-04-05T23:02:19Z
dc.date.available2017-04-05T23:02:19Z
dc.date.issued2016-12
dc.identifier.citationRecipes for Attention: Policy Reforms, Crises, Organizational Characteristics, and the Newspaper Coverage of the LGBT Movement, 1969-2009 2016, 31 (4):926 Sociological Forumen
dc.identifier.issn08848971
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/socf.12290
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/623033
dc.description.abstractWhy do some organizations in a movement seeking social change gain extensive national newspaper coverage? To address the question, we innovate in theoretical and empirical ways. First, we elaborate a theoretical argument that builds from the political mediation theory of movement consequences and incorporates the social organization of newspaper practices. This media and political mediation model integrates political and media contexts and organizations' characteristics and actions. With this model, we hypothesize two main routes to coverage: one that includes changes in public policy and involves policy-engaged, well-resourced, and inclusive organizations and a second that combines social crises and protest organizations. Second, we appraise these arguments with the first analysis of the national coverage of all organizations in a social movement over its career: 84 lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender rights and AIDS-related organizations in the New York Times, Los Angeles Times, and Wall Street Journal from 1969 to 2010. These analyses go beyond previous research that provides either snapshots of many organizations at one point in time or overtime analyses of aggregated groups of organizations or individual organizations. The results of both historical and fuzzy set qualitative comparative analyses support our media and political mediation model.
dc.description.sponsorshipNSF [SES-0752571, SES-1023863]en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherWILEY-BLACKWELLen
dc.relation.urlhttp://doi.wiley.com/10.1111/socf.12290en
dc.rights© 2016 Eastern Sociological Society.en
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
dc.subjectLGBT movementen
dc.subjectmediaen
dc.subjectorganizationsen
dc.subjectpolitical sociologyen
dc.subjectpublic policyen
dc.subjectsocial movementsen
dc.titleRecipes for Attention: Policy Reforms, Crises, Organizational Characteristics, and the Newspaper Coverage of the LGBT Movement, 1969-2009en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Arizona, Sch Sociolen
dc.identifier.journalSociological Forumen
dc.description.note24 month embargo; First published: 26 July 2016en
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en
dc.eprint.versionFinal accepted manuscripten
dc.contributor.institutionSchool of Sociology; University of Arizona; 400 Social Science Plaza Tucson Arizona 85721
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Sociology; University of California, Irvine; 4207 Social Science Plaza B Irvine California 92697
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Sociology; University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; 155 Hamilton Hall CB #3210 Chapel Hill North Carolina 27599
refterms.dateFOA2018-07-27T00:00:00Z
html.description.abstractWhy do some organizations in a movement seeking social change gain extensive national newspaper coverage? To address the question, we innovate in theoretical and empirical ways. First, we elaborate a theoretical argument that builds from the political mediation theory of movement consequences and incorporates the social organization of newspaper practices. This media and political mediation model integrates political and media contexts and organizations' characteristics and actions. With this model, we hypothesize two main routes to coverage: one that includes changes in public policy and involves policy-engaged, well-resourced, and inclusive organizations and a second that combines social crises and protest organizations. Second, we appraise these arguments with the first analysis of the national coverage of all organizations in a social movement over its career: 84 lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender rights and AIDS-related organizations in the New York Times, Los Angeles Times, and Wall Street Journal from 1969 to 2010. These analyses go beyond previous research that provides either snapshots of many organizations at one point in time or overtime analyses of aggregated groups of organizations or individual organizations. The results of both historical and fuzzy set qualitative comparative analyses support our media and political mediation model.


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