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dc.contributor.authorCaraDonna, Paul J.*
dc.contributor.authorPetry, William K.*
dc.contributor.authorBrennan, Ross M.*
dc.contributor.authorCunningham, James L.*
dc.contributor.authorBronstein, Judith L.*
dc.contributor.authorWaser, Nickolas M.*
dc.contributor.authorSanders, Nathan J.*
dc.date.accessioned2017-04-07T23:02:51Z
dc.date.available2017-04-07T23:02:51Z
dc.date.issued2017-03
dc.identifier.citationInteraction rewiring and the rapid turnover of plant-pollinator networks 2017, 20 (3):385 Ecology Lettersen
dc.identifier.issn1461023X
dc.identifier.pmid28156041
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/ele.12740
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/623072
dc.description.abstractWhether species interactions are static or change over time has wide-reaching ecological and evolutionary consequences. However, species interaction networks are typically constructed from temporally aggregated interaction data, thereby implicitly assuming that interactions are fixed. This approach has advanced our understanding of communities, but it obscures the timescale at which interactions form (or dissolve) and the drivers and consequences of such dynamics. We address this knowledge gap by quantifying the within-season turnover of plant-pollinator interactions from weekly censuses across 3years in a subalpine ecosystem. Week-to-week turnover of interactions (1) was high, (2) followed a consistent seasonal progression in all years of study and (3) was dominated by interaction rewiring (the reassembly of interactions among species). Simulation models revealed that species' phenologies and relative abundances constrained both total interaction turnover and rewiring. Our findings reveal the diversity of species interactions that may be missed when the temporal dynamics of networks are ignored.
dc.description.sponsorshipNSF [DGE 11-43953, DBI 12-62713]; Danish National Research Foundation; National Science Foundation Dimensions of Biodiversity grant [NSF-1136703]en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherWILEY-BLACKWELLen
dc.relation.urlhttp://doi.wiley.com/10.1111/ele.12740en
dc.rights© 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd/CNRSen
dc.subjectAdaptive foragingen
dc.subjectbeta-diversityen
dc.subjectcommunity compositionen
dc.subjectfood websen
dc.subjectinteraction turnoveren
dc.subjectmutualismen
dc.subjectnetworksen
dc.subjectnull modelsen
dc.subjectoptimal foraging theoryen
dc.subjectphenologyen
dc.titleInteraction rewiring and the rapid turnover of plant-pollinator networksen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Ecology & Evolutionary Biology, University of Arizonaen
dc.identifier.journalEcology Lettersen
dc.description.note12 month embargo; Version of record online:3 February 2017en
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en
dc.eprint.versionFinal accepted manuscripten
dc.contributor.institutionThe Rocky Mountain Biological Laboratory; Crested Butte CO 81224 USA
dc.contributor.institutionThe Rocky Mountain Biological Laboratory; Crested Butte CO 81224 USA
dc.contributor.institutionThe Rocky Mountain Biological Laboratory; Crested Butte CO 81224 USA
dc.contributor.institutionThe Rocky Mountain Biological Laboratory; Crested Butte CO 81224 USA
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Ecology & Evolutionary Biology; University of Arizona; Tucson AZ 85721 USA
dc.contributor.institutionThe Rocky Mountain Biological Laboratory; Crested Butte CO 81224 USA
dc.contributor.institutionThe Rocky Mountain Biological Laboratory; Crested Butte CO 81224 USA
refterms.dateFOA2018-02-04T00:00:00Z
html.description.abstractWhether species interactions are static or change over time has wide-reaching ecological and evolutionary consequences. However, species interaction networks are typically constructed from temporally aggregated interaction data, thereby implicitly assuming that interactions are fixed. This approach has advanced our understanding of communities, but it obscures the timescale at which interactions form (or dissolve) and the drivers and consequences of such dynamics. We address this knowledge gap by quantifying the within-season turnover of plant-pollinator interactions from weekly censuses across 3years in a subalpine ecosystem. Week-to-week turnover of interactions (1) was high, (2) followed a consistent seasonal progression in all years of study and (3) was dominated by interaction rewiring (the reassembly of interactions among species). Simulation models revealed that species' phenologies and relative abundances constrained both total interaction turnover and rewiring. Our findings reveal the diversity of species interactions that may be missed when the temporal dynamics of networks are ignored.


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