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dc.contributor.authorMartinez, Jessica A.
dc.contributor.authorWertheim, Betsy C.
dc.contributor.authorThomson, Cynthia A.
dc.contributor.authorBea, Jennifer W.
dc.contributor.authorWallace, Robert
dc.contributor.authorAllison, Matthew
dc.contributor.authorSnetselaar, Linda
dc.contributor.authorChen, Zhao
dc.contributor.authorNassir, Rami
dc.contributor.authorThompson, Patricia A.
dc.date.accessioned2017-04-10T23:23:44Z
dc.date.available2017-04-10T23:23:44Z
dc.date.issued2017-02
dc.identifier.citationPhysical Activity Modifies the Association between Dietary Protein and Lean Mass of Postmenopausal Women 2017, 117 (2):192 Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dieteticsen
dc.identifier.issn22122672
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.jand.2016.10.009
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/623078
dc.description.abstractBackground Maintenance of lean muscle mass and related strength is associated with lower risk for numerous chronic diseases of aging in women. Objective Our aim was to evaluate whether the association between dietary protein and lean mass differs by physical activity level, amino acid composition, and body mass index categories. Design We performed a cross-sectional analysis of a prospective cohort. Participants/setting Participants were postmenopausal women from the Womens Health Initiative with body composition measurements by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (n=8,298). Main outcome measures Our study measured percent lean mass, percent fat mass, and lean body mass index. Statistical analyses performed Linear regression models adjusted for scanner serial number, age, calibrated energy intake, race/ethnicity, neighborhood socioeconomic status, and recreational physical activity were used to determine the relationship between protein intake and body composition measures. Likelihood ratio tests and stratified analysis were used to investigate physical activity and body mass index as potential effect modifiers. Results Biomarker-calibrated protein intake was positively associated with percent lean mass; women in the highest protein quintile had 6.3 percentage points higher lean mass than the lowest quintile (P<0.001). This difference rose to 8.5 percentage points for physically active women in the highest protein quintile (P-interaction=0.023). Percent fat mass and lean body mass index were both inversely related to protein intake (both P<0.001). Physical activity further reduced percent fat mass (P-interaction=0.022) and lean body mass index (P-interaction=0.011). Leucine intake was associated with lean mass, as were branched chain amino acids combined (both P<0.001), but not independent of total protein. All associations were observed for normal-weight, overweight, and obese women. Conclusions Protein consumption up to 2.02 g/kg body weight daily is positively associated with lean mass in postmenopausal women. Importantly, those that also engage in physical activity have the highest lean mass across body mass index categories.
dc.description.sponsorshipNational Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, National Institutes of Health; US Department of Health and Human Services [HHSN268201100046C, HHSN268201100001C, HHSN268201100002C, HHSN268201100003C, HHSN268201100004C, HHSN271201100004C]; Susan G. Komen [CCR14299136]en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherELSEVIER SCIENCE INCen
dc.relation.urlhttp://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S2212267216312175en
dc.rights© 2017 by the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics.en
dc.subjectDietary proteinen
dc.subjectLeucineen
dc.subjectPhysical activityen
dc.subjectLean massen
dc.subjectFat massen
dc.titlePhysical Activity Modifies the Association between Dietary Protein and Lean Mass of Postmenopausal Womenen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Nutritional Sciences, University of Arizona Cancer Center, University of Arizonaen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Arizona Cancer Center, University of Arizonaen
dc.contributor.departmentMel & Enid Zuckerman College of Public Health, University of Arizonaen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Mel & Enid Zuckerman College of Public Health, University of Arizonaen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Medicine, and assistant research scientist, Department of Nutritional Sciences, University of Arizona Cancer Center, University of Arizonaen
dc.identifier.journalJournal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dieteticsen
dc.description.note12 month embargo; Available online 30 November 2016en
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en
dc.eprint.versionFinal accepted manuscripten
refterms.dateFOA2017-12-01T00:00:00Z
html.description.abstractBackground Maintenance of lean muscle mass and related strength is associated with lower risk for numerous chronic diseases of aging in women. Objective Our aim was to evaluate whether the association between dietary protein and lean mass differs by physical activity level, amino acid composition, and body mass index categories. Design We performed a cross-sectional analysis of a prospective cohort. Participants/setting Participants were postmenopausal women from the Womens Health Initiative with body composition measurements by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (n=8,298). Main outcome measures Our study measured percent lean mass, percent fat mass, and lean body mass index. Statistical analyses performed Linear regression models adjusted for scanner serial number, age, calibrated energy intake, race/ethnicity, neighborhood socioeconomic status, and recreational physical activity were used to determine the relationship between protein intake and body composition measures. Likelihood ratio tests and stratified analysis were used to investigate physical activity and body mass index as potential effect modifiers. Results Biomarker-calibrated protein intake was positively associated with percent lean mass; women in the highest protein quintile had 6.3 percentage points higher lean mass than the lowest quintile (P<0.001). This difference rose to 8.5 percentage points for physically active women in the highest protein quintile (P-interaction=0.023). Percent fat mass and lean body mass index were both inversely related to protein intake (both P<0.001). Physical activity further reduced percent fat mass (P-interaction=0.022) and lean body mass index (P-interaction=0.011). Leucine intake was associated with lean mass, as were branched chain amino acids combined (both P<0.001), but not independent of total protein. All associations were observed for normal-weight, overweight, and obese women. Conclusions Protein consumption up to 2.02 g/kg body weight daily is positively associated with lean mass in postmenopausal women. Importantly, those that also engage in physical activity have the highest lean mass across body mass index categories.


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