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dc.contributor.authorWall, Tamara U.
dc.contributor.authorMeadow, Alison M.
dc.contributor.authorHorganic, Alexandra
dc.date.accessioned2017-04-12T00:32:30Z
dc.date.available2017-04-12T00:32:30Z
dc.date.issued2017-01
dc.identifier.citationDeveloping Evaluation Indicators to Improve the Process of Coproducing Usable Climate Science 2017, 9 (1):95 Weather, Climate, and Societyen
dc.identifier.issn1948-8327
dc.identifier.issn1948-8335
dc.identifier.doi10.1175/WCAS-D-16-0008.1
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/623111
dc.description.abstractResource managers and decision-makers are increasingly tasked with integrating climate change science into their decisions about resource management and policy development. This often requires climate scientists, resource managers, and decision-makers to work collaboratively throughout the research processes, an approach to knowledge development that is often called "coproduction of knowledge." The goal of this paper is to synthesize the social science theory of coproduction of knowledge, the metrics currently used to evaluate usable or actionable science in several federal agencies, and insights from experienced climate researchers and program managers to develop a set of 45 indicators supporting an evaluation framework for coproduced usable climate science. Here the proposed indicators and results from two case studies that were used to test the indicators are presented, as well as lessons about the process of evaluating the coproduction of knowledge and collaboratively producing climate knowledge.
dc.description.sponsorshipDepartment of the Interior Southwest Climate Science Center Award [G13AC00326]; National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Climate Program Office [NA11OAR4310150]; California Nevada Applications Program at the Desert Research Instituteen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherAMER METEOROLOGICAL SOCen
dc.relation.urlhttp://journals.ametsoc.org/doi/10.1175/WCAS-D-16-0008.1en
dc.rights© 2017 American Meteorological Societyen
dc.titleDeveloping Evaluation Indicators to Improve the Process of Coproducing Usable Climate Scienceen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Arizona, Inst Environmen
dc.identifier.journalWeather, Climate, and Societyen
dc.description.note6 month embargo; Published Online 20 January 2017.en
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en
dc.eprint.versionFinal published versionen
dc.contributor.institutionDivision of Atmospheric Sciences, Desert Research Institute, Reno, Nevada
dc.contributor.institutionInstitute for the Environment, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona
dc.contributor.institutionInstitute for the Environment, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona
refterms.dateFOA2017-07-21T00:00:00Z
html.description.abstractResource managers and decision-makers are increasingly tasked with integrating climate change science into their decisions about resource management and policy development. This often requires climate scientists, resource managers, and decision-makers to work collaboratively throughout the research processes, an approach to knowledge development that is often called "coproduction of knowledge." The goal of this paper is to synthesize the social science theory of coproduction of knowledge, the metrics currently used to evaluate usable or actionable science in several federal agencies, and insights from experienced climate researchers and program managers to develop a set of 45 indicators supporting an evaluation framework for coproduced usable climate science. Here the proposed indicators and results from two case studies that were used to test the indicators are presented, as well as lessons about the process of evaluating the coproduction of knowledge and collaboratively producing climate knowledge.


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