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dc.contributor.authorBatool-Anwar, Salma
dc.contributor.authorGoodwin, James L
dc.contributor.authorKushida, Clete A
dc.contributor.authorWalsh, James A
dc.contributor.authorSimon, Richard D
dc.contributor.authorNichols, Deborah A
dc.contributor.authorQuan, Stuart F
dc.date.accessioned2017-04-13T01:01:01Z
dc.date.available2017-04-13T01:01:01Z
dc.date.issued2016-05-30
dc.identifier.citationImpact of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) on quality of life in patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). 2016, 25 (6):731-738 J Sleep Resen
dc.identifier.issn1365-2869
dc.identifier.pmid27242272
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/jsr.12430
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/623127
dc.description.abstractObstructive sleep apnea is a chronic illness with increasing prevalence. In addition to associated cardiovascular comorbidities, obstructive sleep apnea syndrome has been linked to poor quality of life, occupational accidents, and motor vehicle crashes secondary to excessive daytime sleepiness. Although continuous positive airway pressure is the gold standard for sleep apnea treatment, its effects on quality of life are not well defined. In the current study we investigated the effects of treatment on quality of life using the data from the Apnea Positive Pressure Long-term Efficacy Study (APPLES), a randomized controlled trial of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) versus sham CPAP. The Calgary Sleep Apnea Quality of Life Index (SAQLI) was used to assess quality of life. Overall we found no significant improvement in quality of life among sleep apnea patients after CPAP treatment. However, after stratifying by OSA severity, it was found that long-term improvement in quality of life might occur with the use of CPAP in people with severe and possibly moderate sleep apnea, and no demonstrable improvement in quality of life was noted among participants with mild obstructive sleep apnea.
dc.description.sponsorshipNational Heart, Lung and Blood Institute: 5UO1-HL-068060, National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke: N44-NS-002394en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherWileyen
dc.rights© 2016 European Sleep Research Societyen
dc.subjectContinuous positive airway pressureen
dc.subjectdaytime sleepinessen
dc.subjectadherenceen
dc.subjectsleep apneaen
dc.subjectquality of lifeen
dc.titleImpact of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) on quality of life in patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA).en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentDivision of Sleep and Circadian Disorders Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Division of Sleep Medicine, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USAen
dc.contributor.departmentArizona Respiratory Center, University of Arizona College of Medicine, Tucson, AZ, USAen
dc.contributor.departmentStanford University, Stanford, CA, USA.en
dc.contributor.departmentSt Luke's Hospital, Chesterfield, MO, USAen
dc.contributor.departmentSt Mary Medical Center, Walla Walla, WA, USAen
dc.identifier.journalJournal of sleep researchen
dc.description.note12 month embargo; Version of record online: 30 May 2016en
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en
dc.eprint.versionFinal accepted manuscripten
html.description.abstractObstructive sleep apnea is a chronic illness with increasing prevalence. In addition to associated cardiovascular comorbidities, obstructive sleep apnea syndrome has been linked to poor quality of life, occupational accidents, and motor vehicle crashes secondary to excessive daytime sleepiness. Although continuous positive airway pressure is the gold standard for sleep apnea treatment, its effects on quality of life are not well defined. In the current study we investigated the effects of treatment on quality of life using the data from the Apnea Positive Pressure Long-term Efficacy Study (APPLES), a randomized controlled trial of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) versus sham CPAP. The Calgary Sleep Apnea Quality of Life Index (SAQLI) was used to assess quality of life. Overall we found no significant improvement in quality of life among sleep apnea patients after CPAP treatment. However, after stratifying by OSA severity, it was found that long-term improvement in quality of life might occur with the use of CPAP in people with severe and possibly moderate sleep apnea, and no demonstrable improvement in quality of life was noted among participants with mild obstructive sleep apnea.


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