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dc.contributor.advisorEdgin, Jamieen
dc.contributor.authorSakhon, Stella
dc.creatorSakhon, Stellaen
dc.date.accessioned2017-04-20T00:38:36Z
dc.date.available2017-04-20T00:38:36Z
dc.date.issued2016
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/623161
dc.description.abstractThe hippocampus plays a critical role in binding together information into an integrated memory, and memory for these arbitrary associations is important when learning new words. Recent studies have investigated a learning mechanism called fast mapping (FM), showing that rapid acquisition of novel arbitrary associations can be learned independent of the hippocampus. In the current study we examine word-learning across two conditions more and less likely to require information integration via the hippocampus in typically developing children and individuals with hippocampal dysfunction (e.g., Down syndrome). Individuals with Down syndrome (DS) manifest hippocampal dysfunction and display memory and learning difficulties, hence could potentially benefit from alternative learning strategies. The current study found no benefit of the FM condition in either group. Both groups performed similarly and above chance level across the two conditions and over a week's delay, but a delay by group interaction suggested that the typically developing children showed improvement across all conditions after 1 week whereas performance in DS stayed consistent. Given evidence for sleep deficits in DS we examined how sleep disturbance related to delayed word retention. Sleep efficiency did not appear to be driving maintenance in either group. Future studies investigating when an individual with DS sleeps after learning, could provide a better understanding of how sleep can influence the word learning process. Additionally, future studies in an older group of children can also provide information on when the hippocampus and sleep dependent learning may develop in childhood.
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.subjectDown syndromeen
dc.subjectFast mappingen
dc.subjectMemoryen
dc.subjectSleepen
dc.subjectWord-Learningen
dc.subjectDevelopmenten
dc.titleMechanisms of Word-Learning in Typical and Atypical Developmenten_US
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
thesis.degree.levelmastersen
dc.contributor.committeememberEdgin, Jamieen
dc.contributor.committeememberNadel, Lynnen
dc.contributor.committeememberGlisky, Elizabethen
dc.description.releaseRelease after 20-Jan-2019en
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen
thesis.degree.disciplinePsychologyen
thesis.degree.nameM.A.en
html.description.abstractThe hippocampus plays a critical role in binding together information into an integrated memory, and memory for these arbitrary associations is important when learning new words. Recent studies have investigated a learning mechanism called fast mapping (FM), showing that rapid acquisition of novel arbitrary associations can be learned independent of the hippocampus. In the current study we examine word-learning across two conditions more and less likely to require information integration via the hippocampus in typically developing children and individuals with hippocampal dysfunction (e.g., Down syndrome). Individuals with Down syndrome (DS) manifest hippocampal dysfunction and display memory and learning difficulties, hence could potentially benefit from alternative learning strategies. The current study found no benefit of the FM condition in either group. Both groups performed similarly and above chance level across the two conditions and over a week's delay, but a delay by group interaction suggested that the typically developing children showed improvement across all conditions after 1 week whereas performance in DS stayed consistent. Given evidence for sleep deficits in DS we examined how sleep disturbance related to delayed word retention. Sleep efficiency did not appear to be driving maintenance in either group. Future studies investigating when an individual with DS sleeps after learning, could provide a better understanding of how sleep can influence the word learning process. Additionally, future studies in an older group of children can also provide information on when the hippocampus and sleep dependent learning may develop in childhood.


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