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dc.contributor.authorEngelhardt, Toni
dc.contributor.authorJedicke, Robert
dc.contributor.authorVereš, Peter
dc.contributor.authorFitzsimmons, Alan
dc.contributor.authorDenneau, Larry
dc.contributor.authorBeshore, Ed
dc.contributor.authorMeinke, Bonnie
dc.date.accessioned2017-04-26T22:12:05Z
dc.date.available2017-04-26T22:12:05Z
dc.date.issued2017-02-27
dc.identifier.citationAn Observational Upper Limit on the Interstellar Number Density of Asteroids and Comets 2017, 153 (3):133 The Astronomical Journalen
dc.identifier.issn1538-3881
dc.identifier.doi10.3847/1538-3881/aa5c8a
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/623256
dc.description.abstractWe derived 90% confidence limits (CLs) on the interstellar number density (rho(CL)(IS)) of interstellar objects (ISOs; comets and asteroids) as a function of the slope of their size-frequency distribution (SFD) and limiting absolute magnitude. To account for gravitational focusing, we first generated a quasi-realistic ISO population to similar to 750 au from the Sun and propagated it forward in time to generate a steady state population of ISOs with heliocentric distance <50 au. We then simulated the detection of the synthetic ISOs using pointing data for each image and average detection efficiencies for each of three contemporary solar system surveys-Pan-STARRS1, the Mt. Lemmon Survey, and the Catalina Sky Survey. These simulations allowed us to determine the surveys' combined ISO detection efficiency under several different but realistic modes of identifying ISOs in the survey data. Some of the synthetic detected ISOs had eccentricities as small as 1.01, which is in the range of the largest eccentricities of several known comets. Our best CL of rho(CL)(SI) = 1.4 x 10(-4) au(-3) implies that the expectation that extra-solar systems form like our solar system, eject planetesimals in the same way, and then distribute them throughout the Galaxy, is too simplistic, or that the SFD or behavior of ISOs as they pass through our solar system is far from expectation.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherIOP PUBLISHING LTDen
dc.relation.urlhttp://stacks.iop.org/1538-3881/153/i=3/a=133?key=crossref.252947abbb8448851d3bef034990461een
dc.rights© 2017. The American Astronomical Society. All rights reserved.en
dc.subjectcometsen
dc.subjectgeneral - minor planetsen
dc.subjectasteroidsen
dc.subjectgeneral - planetary systemsen
dc.subjectprotoplanetary disksen
dc.titleAn Observational Upper Limit on the Interstellar Number Density of Asteroids and Cometsen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Arizona, Lunar & Planetary Laben
dc.identifier.journalThe Astronomical Journalen
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en
dc.eprint.versionFinal published versionen
refterms.dateFOA2018-08-18T13:34:50Z
html.description.abstractWe derived 90% confidence limits (CLs) on the interstellar number density (rho(CL)(IS)) of interstellar objects (ISOs; comets and asteroids) as a function of the slope of their size-frequency distribution (SFD) and limiting absolute magnitude. To account for gravitational focusing, we first generated a quasi-realistic ISO population to similar to 750 au from the Sun and propagated it forward in time to generate a steady state population of ISOs with heliocentric distance <50 au. We then simulated the detection of the synthetic ISOs using pointing data for each image and average detection efficiencies for each of three contemporary solar system surveys-Pan-STARRS1, the Mt. Lemmon Survey, and the Catalina Sky Survey. These simulations allowed us to determine the surveys' combined ISO detection efficiency under several different but realistic modes of identifying ISOs in the survey data. Some of the synthetic detected ISOs had eccentricities as small as 1.01, which is in the range of the largest eccentricities of several known comets. Our best CL of rho(CL)(SI) = 1.4 x 10(-4) au(-3) implies that the expectation that extra-solar systems form like our solar system, eject planetesimals in the same way, and then distribute them throughout the Galaxy, is too simplistic, or that the SFD or behavior of ISOs as they pass through our solar system is far from expectation.


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