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dc.contributor.authorDare, Reese
dc.date.accessioned2017-04-28T22:40:04Z
dc.date.available2017-04-28T22:40:04Z
dc.date.issued2017-04-28
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/623294
dc.descriptionA Thesis submitted to The University of Arizona College of Medicine - Phoenix in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the Degree of Doctor of Medicine.en
dc.description.abstractNeuroleptic medications are commonly administered in the emergency department but are known to induce extrapyramidal symptoms (EPS) in some patients; typically dystonia and akathisia. This systematic review will examine if adjunctive medications are efficacious when given in conjunction with neuroleptic medications to prevent these extrapyramidal symptoms. The Central, DARE, LILACS, PubMed, CINAHL, and OVID databases were searched for relevant articles between January 2014 and February 2016. Inclusion criteria required the article to be a randomized controlled trial; administer an anticholinergic medication given concurrently or just prior to treatment with medications with known extrapyramidal side effects; and be published in English. The initial search strategy yielded 1222 prospective articles of which 1208 were excluded by title and/or abstract. Fourteen articles were retrieved in full text and independently reviewed by each author. Seven 7 RCTs representing 645 patients were determined to be appropriate for analysis. Meta‐analysis of 5 studies found a significant effect (OR 0.4 with 95% CI 0.23‐0.71) for utilizing anticholinergic adjunct medications in the prevention of EPS for 60 minutes after administration. No reduction was found (OR 1.14 with 95% CI 0.01‐164) in EPS after 60 minutes in meta‐analysis of 2 studies with opposing results. Adjunctive anticholinergic medication was effective in reducing symptoms of dystonia (OR 0.13 with 95% CI 0.04‐0.43) but not in reducing symptoms of akathisia (OR 0.74 with 95% CI 0.27‐1.98). This systematic review found that anticholinergic adjuvant anticholinergic treatment reduced EPS induced by antipsychotic medications during 60 minutes after administration, with the greatest reduction in dystonic symptoms.
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherThe University of Arizonaen_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the College of Medicine - Phoenix, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.subjectAnticholinergicen
dc.subjectExtrapyramidal Symptomsen
dc.subjectNeurolepticsen
dc.subjectProphylaxisen
dc.subject.meshCholinergic Antagonistsen
dc.subject.meshAntipsychotic Agentsen
dc.titleProphylactic Anticholinergic Medications to Prevent Drug-Induced Extrapyramidal Symptoms: A Systematic Reviewen_US
dc.typetext; Electronic Thesisen
dc.contributor.departmentThe University of Arizona College of Medicine - Phoenixen
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item is part of the College of Medicine - Phoenix Scholarly Projects 2017 collection. For more information, contact the Phoenix Biomedical Campus Library at pbc-library@email.arizona.edu.en_US
dc.contributor.mentorStapczynski, J. Stephanen
refterms.dateFOA2018-06-17T15:55:35Z
html.description.abstractNeuroleptic medications are commonly administered in the emergency department but are known to induce extrapyramidal symptoms (EPS) in some patients; typically dystonia and akathisia. This systematic review will examine if adjunctive medications are efficacious when given in conjunction with neuroleptic medications to prevent these extrapyramidal symptoms. The Central, DARE, LILACS, PubMed, CINAHL, and OVID databases were searched for relevant articles between January 2014 and February 2016. Inclusion criteria required the article to be a randomized controlled trial; administer an anticholinergic medication given concurrently or just prior to treatment with medications with known extrapyramidal side effects; and be published in English. The initial search strategy yielded 1222 prospective articles of which 1208 were excluded by title and/or abstract. Fourteen articles were retrieved in full text and independently reviewed by each author. Seven 7 RCTs representing 645 patients were determined to be appropriate for analysis. Meta‐analysis of 5 studies found a significant effect (OR 0.4 with 95% CI 0.23‐0.71) for utilizing anticholinergic adjunct medications in the prevention of EPS for 60 minutes after administration. No reduction was found (OR 1.14 with 95% CI 0.01‐164) in EPS after 60 minutes in meta‐analysis of 2 studies with opposing results. Adjunctive anticholinergic medication was effective in reducing symptoms of dystonia (OR 0.13 with 95% CI 0.04‐0.43) but not in reducing symptoms of akathisia (OR 0.74 with 95% CI 0.27‐1.98). This systematic review found that anticholinergic adjuvant anticholinergic treatment reduced EPS induced by antipsychotic medications during 60 minutes after administration, with the greatest reduction in dystonic symptoms.


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