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dc.contributor.authorDavis, Amyen
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-08T19:04:05Z
dc.date.available2017-05-08T19:04:05Z
dc.date.issued2017-05-08
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/623427
dc.descriptionA Thesis submitted to The University of Arizona College of Medicine - Phoenix in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the Degree of Doctor of Medicine.en
dc.description.abstractType 2 diabetes (T2D) continues to be a growing public health concern and will be the seventh leading cause of death by 2030.  Education programs have shown to be moderately effective in disease management, but there are little known about interactive patient‐centered diabetes programs.  This study implemented a single‐group pretest‐posttest quasi‐experimental design including a three‐session novel patient‐centered diabetes education program at the Phoenix Veterans Affairs Medical Center using the model originally developed by Esden and Nichols.  Measurements were obtained using validated and reliable instruments from Michigan Diabetes Research Training Center (MDRTC), which included the Brief Diabetes Knowledge Test (BDKT) and Diabetes Empowerment Scale (DES), and a participant satisfaction survey.  Results showed participants’ knowledge of diabetes was higher at three months follow up (M = 17; SD = 4.64) than at baseline/pretest (M = 13.8; SD = 2.95) with a 23 percent change in knowledge scores from baseline 95% CI [0.24,6.16], with corrected Cohen’s dunbiased = 0.66 (i.e., medium effect).  There was very good pre‐test reliability for the DES subscales: “managing the psychosocial aspects of diabetes” (0.93), “assessing dissatisfaction and readiness to change (0.83), “setting and achieving goals” (0.88).  Despite moderate effects in these 3 subscales, there were no statistically significant differences in posttest scores.  In conclusion, Esden and Nichol’s model was successfully replicated in the VA Heath Care setting, and future work with a larger sample size and matched control is needed to further validate the results found in this study. 
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the College of Medicine - Phoenix, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.subject.meshDiabetes Mellitus, Type 2en
dc.subject.meshEducation; Healthen
dc.subject.meshPatientsen
dc.subject.meshFeasibility Studiesen
dc.subject.meshPatient-Centered Careen
dc.subject.meshPatient Outcome Assessmenten
dc.titleNovel Patient‐Centered Diabetes Education Program: A Study to Assess The Feasibility, Design, Implementation, and Impact On Patientsen_US
dc.typeThesisen
dc.contributor.departmentThe University of Arizona College of Medicine - Phoenixen
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item is part of the College of Medicine - Phoenix Scholarly Projects 2017 collection. For more information, contact the Phoenix Biomedical Campus Library at pbc-library@email.arizona.edu.en
dc.contributor.mentorRehman, Shakaib MDen
dc.subject.keywordPatient-centereden
refterms.dateFOA2018-09-11T19:23:42Z
html.description.abstractType 2 diabetes (T2D) continues to be a growing public health concern and will be the seventh leading cause of death by 2030.  Education programs have shown to be moderately effective in disease management, but there are little known about interactive patient‐centered diabetes programs.  This study implemented a single‐group pretest‐posttest quasi‐experimental design including a three‐session novel patient‐centered diabetes education program at the Phoenix Veterans Affairs Medical Center using the model originally developed by Esden and Nichols.  Measurements were obtained using validated and reliable instruments from Michigan Diabetes Research Training Center (MDRTC), which included the Brief Diabetes Knowledge Test (BDKT) and Diabetes Empowerment Scale (DES), and a participant satisfaction survey.  Results showed participants’ knowledge of diabetes was higher at three months follow up (M = 17; SD = 4.64) than at baseline/pretest (M = 13.8; SD = 2.95) with a 23 percent change in knowledge scores from baseline 95% CI [0.24,6.16], with corrected Cohen’s dunbiased = 0.66 (i.e., medium effect).  There was very good pre‐test reliability for the DES subscales: “managing the psychosocial aspects of diabetes” (0.93), “assessing dissatisfaction and readiness to change (0.83), “setting and achieving goals” (0.88).  Despite moderate effects in these 3 subscales, there were no statistically significant differences in posttest scores.  In conclusion, Esden and Nichol’s model was successfully replicated in the VA Heath Care setting, and future work with a larger sample size and matched control is needed to further validate the results found in this study. 


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