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dc.contributor.authorMcCabe, Chris*
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-11T22:58:23Z
dc.date.available2017-05-11T22:58:23Z
dc.date.issued2017-05-11
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/623487
dc.descriptionA Thesis submitted to The University of Arizona College of Medicine - Phoenix in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the Degree of Doctor of Medicine.en
dc.description.abstractThis systematic review focuses on improving recognition and treatment of acute medical conditions in pregnant women, infants and children in low and middle income countries by Community Health Workers (CHWs). By examining critically selected articles from different electronic databases, this review seeks to organize and present the important characteristics of a training program aimed at reducing maternal, neonatal and childhood mortality. Data in the form of peer‐reviewed and published articles were collected using three public databases – PubMed, Ovid and EMBASE – using specific search terms. Greater than 300 articles where found using the specific search terms. Those articles were then processed through a series of inclusion and exclusion criteria resulting in a cohort of papers which were then individually analyzed for content. After critical analysis of all 15 publications included in the study, it becomes clear that training programs are incredibly diverse. These four aspects of training programs appear to be the most variable between the studies: size of the training program, length of the training program, training assessment and follow‐up refresher courses. Training programs that are shorter in duration or greater in class number do not seem to be any less effective than longer programs with fewer participants. Future studies should be performed in which one training program with identical training techniques, lengths, and focuses is taught in different regions. The impact that this study has on the literature is as follows: Training programs of shorter duration seem to be as effective as their longer counterparts. Finally, there is a clear need for more robust, standardized and geographically and culturally diverse training programs to more effectively study training methods.
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherThe University of Arizonaen_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the College of Medicine - Phoenix, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.subjectCHWen
dc.subjectTraining Programsen
dc.subjectMiddle Income Countriesen
dc.subject.meshCommunity Health Workersen
dc.subject.meshInfant, Newbornen
dc.subject.meshMaternal Healthen
dc.subject.meshChild Mortalityen
dc.subject.meshMaternal Mortalityen
dc.subject.meshInfant Mortalityen
dc.titleTraining of Community Health Workers: Recognition of Maternal, Neonatal and Pediatric Illnessen_US
dc.typetext; Electronic Thesisen
dc.contributor.departmentThe University of Arizona College of Medicine - Phoenixen
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item is part of the College of Medicine - Phoenix Scholarly Projects 2017 collection. For more information, contact the Phoenix Biomedical Campus Library at pbc-library@email.arizona.edu.en_US
dc.contributor.mentorYoblonski, Laraen
refterms.dateFOA2018-07-06T07:36:56Z
html.description.abstractThis systematic review focuses on improving recognition and treatment of acute medical conditions in pregnant women, infants and children in low and middle income countries by Community Health Workers (CHWs). By examining critically selected articles from different electronic databases, this review seeks to organize and present the important characteristics of a training program aimed at reducing maternal, neonatal and childhood mortality. Data in the form of peer‐reviewed and published articles were collected using three public databases – PubMed, Ovid and EMBASE – using specific search terms. Greater than 300 articles where found using the specific search terms. Those articles were then processed through a series of inclusion and exclusion criteria resulting in a cohort of papers which were then individually analyzed for content. After critical analysis of all 15 publications included in the study, it becomes clear that training programs are incredibly diverse. These four aspects of training programs appear to be the most variable between the studies: size of the training program, length of the training program, training assessment and follow‐up refresher courses. Training programs that are shorter in duration or greater in class number do not seem to be any less effective than longer programs with fewer participants. Future studies should be performed in which one training program with identical training techniques, lengths, and focuses is taught in different regions. The impact that this study has on the literature is as follows: Training programs of shorter duration seem to be as effective as their longer counterparts. Finally, there is a clear need for more robust, standardized and geographically and culturally diverse training programs to more effectively study training methods.


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