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dc.contributor.authorBarry, Jonnae Y.
dc.contributor.authorReghunathan, Saranya
dc.contributor.authorJacob, Abraham
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-17T19:32:21Z
dc.date.available2017-05-17T19:32:21Z
dc.date.issued2017-02
dc.identifier.citationFirst Report 2017, 38 (2):221 Otology & Neurotologyen
dc.identifier.issn1531-7129
dc.identifier.doi10.1097/MAO.0000000000001290
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/623522
dc.description.abstractObjectives: Discuss use of a linear incision for placement of a magnetically coupled bone anchored hearing implant. Methods: Case series. Results: Two patients underwent placement of magnetically coupled bone-anchored hearing implants (BAHI) through linear incisions. The first, a 40-year-old female with congenital single-sided deafness, previously had successful implantation of a percutaneous bone anchored hearing implant through a linear incision; unfortunately, she developed pain and intermittent drainage at her abutment site with time, resulting in a request for removal of her device. As an alternative to complete removal, we offered to replace the percutaneous implant with a magnetically coupled BAHI, employing the same linear incision previously. The second patient, a 53-year-old obese female with limited neck mobility and mixed hearing loss, underwent primary placement of a magnetically coupled BAHI through a linear incision. Limitations in neck mobility and patient body habitus precluded use of a traditional C-shaped incision. Both patients underwent surgery successfully, healed without incident, had their devices activated 6 weeks after their procedures, and are able to wear their implants more than 8 hours per day without discomfort. Conclusion: Surgical techniques for bone-anchored implants continue to evolve. Though manufacturers of magnetically coupled devices recommend using C-shaped incisions with large skin flaps, our first reported cases suggest that a small linear incision immediately overlying the implant magnet may be an acceptable alternative. Potential benefits include a smaller incision, less hair removal, smaller flap, decreased surgical time, and less postoperative pain.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherLIPPINCOTT WILLIAMS & WILKINSen
dc.relation.urlhttp://content.wkhealth.com/linkback/openurl?sid=WKPTLP:landingpage&an=00129492-201702000-00010en
dc.rights© 2017, Otology & Neurotology, Inc.en
dc.subjectBAHAen
dc.subjectbone anchored hearing implanten
dc.subjectmagnetically coupled deviceen
dc.subjectosteointegrating deviceen
dc.titleFirst Report: Linear Incision for Placement of a Magnetically Coupled Bone-Anchored Hearing Implanten
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery, The University of Arizona College of Medicine, Tucson, Arizonaen
dc.identifier.journalOtology & Neurotologyen
dc.description.note12 month embargo; published Feb 2017en
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en
dc.eprint.versionFinal accepted manuscripten
refterms.dateFOA2018-03-01T00:00:00Z
html.description.abstractObjectives: Discuss use of a linear incision for placement of a magnetically coupled bone anchored hearing implant. Methods: Case series. Results: Two patients underwent placement of magnetically coupled bone-anchored hearing implants (BAHI) through linear incisions. The first, a 40-year-old female with congenital single-sided deafness, previously had successful implantation of a percutaneous bone anchored hearing implant through a linear incision; unfortunately, she developed pain and intermittent drainage at her abutment site with time, resulting in a request for removal of her device. As an alternative to complete removal, we offered to replace the percutaneous implant with a magnetically coupled BAHI, employing the same linear incision previously. The second patient, a 53-year-old obese female with limited neck mobility and mixed hearing loss, underwent primary placement of a magnetically coupled BAHI through a linear incision. Limitations in neck mobility and patient body habitus precluded use of a traditional C-shaped incision. Both patients underwent surgery successfully, healed without incident, had their devices activated 6 weeks after their procedures, and are able to wear their implants more than 8 hours per day without discomfort. Conclusion: Surgical techniques for bone-anchored implants continue to evolve. Though manufacturers of magnetically coupled devices recommend using C-shaped incisions with large skin flaps, our first reported cases suggest that a small linear incision immediately overlying the implant magnet may be an acceptable alternative. Potential benefits include a smaller incision, less hair removal, smaller flap, decreased surgical time, and less postoperative pain.


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