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dc.contributor.authorSpaulding, Kole
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-19T19:21:58Z
dc.date.available2017-05-19T19:21:58Z
dc.date.issued2017-05-19
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/623540
dc.descriptionA Thesis submitted to The University of Arizona College of Medicine - Phoenix in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the Degree of Doctor of Medicine.en
dc.description.abstractAdolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis (AIS) is typically treated surgically by Posterior Spinal Fusion (PSF) surgery. Intravenous analgesics and oral opioids are commonly used for pain management. Several adjunct therapies are used in addition to the standard treatments. One of these therapies is the use of dexmedetomidine (dex). Though dex has been found to be an effective sedative for post‐operative patients, there are also several adverse effects that are associated with its use. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effectiveness and overall benefit of using dex for pain control for patients undergoing PSF for AIS. IRB approval was obtained. A group of 43 patients with AIS undergoing PSF and using Dex for adjunctive pain control were matched with 43 patients who did not use Dex. The groups were matched based on gender, age, height, weight, and level of spinal fusion. During the patients’ post‐operative hospital stay, the total opioid use and clinical pain scores were compared between the two groups using t‐tests, with significance set at p<0.05. Total opiate use was 239.6 morphine equivalent doses in the non‐Dex (control) group and 246.2 in the group that received Dex (p=0.72). The average pain score in the control group was 2.3, and the group that received Dex was 2.6 (p =0.43). There were no differences in the complication rate between the two groups, specifically the oversedation rates and pulmonary complications. Lastly, the average length of stay for the control group was 4.8 days compared to the dex group, which was 5.0 days (p=0.35). Although adjunctive pain modalities may be very useful in the treatment of postoperative pain after PSF in patients with AIS, the use of Dex in this cohort did not improve pain scores, lower opioid use, or lower the LOS. Based on these results, we do not recommend the routine use of dexmedetomidine as an adjunctive pain control modality. Adjunctive modalities are important in pain control in patients with AIS undergoing PSF, but the use of dexmedotomidine was not effective in improving pain control.
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the College of Medicine - Phoenix, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.subjectIdiopathic Scoliosisen
dc.subjectPosterior Spinal Fusion (PSF)en
dc.subjectSpinal Surgeryen
dc.subject.meshAnalgesics, Opioiden
dc.subject.meshDexmedetomidineen
dc.subject.meshScoliosisen
dc.subject.meshAdolescenten
dc.subject.meshTreatment Outcomeen
dc.subject.meshPatient Outcome Assessmenten
dc.subject.meshPain Managementen
dc.subject.meshPain, Postoperativeen
dc.subject.meshLength of Stayen
dc.titleDoes Adjunctive Pain Control with Dexmedetomidine Improve Outcomes in Patients with Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis?en_US
dc.typetext; Electronic Thesisen
dc.contributor.departmentThe University of Arizona College of Medicine - Phoenixen
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item is part of the College of Medicine - Phoenix Scholarly Projects 2017 collection. For more information, contact the Phoenix Biomedical Campus Library at pbc-library@email.arizona.edu.en_US
dc.contributor.mentorShrader, M. Wadeen
refterms.dateFOA2018-09-11T19:31:55Z
html.description.abstractAdolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis (AIS) is typically treated surgically by Posterior Spinal Fusion (PSF) surgery. Intravenous analgesics and oral opioids are commonly used for pain management. Several adjunct therapies are used in addition to the standard treatments. One of these therapies is the use of dexmedetomidine (dex). Though dex has been found to be an effective sedative for post‐operative patients, there are also several adverse effects that are associated with its use. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effectiveness and overall benefit of using dex for pain control for patients undergoing PSF for AIS. IRB approval was obtained. A group of 43 patients with AIS undergoing PSF and using Dex for adjunctive pain control were matched with 43 patients who did not use Dex. The groups were matched based on gender, age, height, weight, and level of spinal fusion. During the patients’ post‐operative hospital stay, the total opioid use and clinical pain scores were compared between the two groups using t‐tests, with significance set at p<0.05. Total opiate use was 239.6 morphine equivalent doses in the non‐Dex (control) group and 246.2 in the group that received Dex (p=0.72). The average pain score in the control group was 2.3, and the group that received Dex was 2.6 (p =0.43). There were no differences in the complication rate between the two groups, specifically the oversedation rates and pulmonary complications. Lastly, the average length of stay for the control group was 4.8 days compared to the dex group, which was 5.0 days (p=0.35). Although adjunctive pain modalities may be very useful in the treatment of postoperative pain after PSF in patients with AIS, the use of Dex in this cohort did not improve pain scores, lower opioid use, or lower the LOS. Based on these results, we do not recommend the routine use of dexmedetomidine as an adjunctive pain control modality. Adjunctive modalities are important in pain control in patients with AIS undergoing PSF, but the use of dexmedotomidine was not effective in improving pain control.


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