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dc.contributor.authorStevenson, Justin
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-19T20:23:21Z
dc.date.available2017-05-19T20:23:21Z
dc.date.issued2017-05-19
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/623543
dc.descriptionA Thesis submitted to The University of Arizona College of Medicine - Phoenix in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the Degree of Doctor of Medicine.en
dc.description.abstractIn the United States the responsibility to develop criteria for trauma patient’s triage status rests upon individual hospitals rather than the American College of Surgeons. Traumatic injuries from large animals represent a potential need for expanded hospital resources. Urban emergency departments are less likely to regularly see patients with large‐animal related injuries and might be expected to underestimate the predicted injuries. There is scarce research on the topic of initial triage designation for large‐animal related injuries. The aim of this study is to investigate the adequacy of the initial triage designation given to patients presenting with injuries from animals larger than themselves at an urban, safety net, academic Emergency Department and Trauma Center (ACS Level 1 Adult, Level 2 Pediatric). A retrospective chart review was performed on patients presenting to the emergency department (ED) from Jan 2006 until September 2015 with injuries resulting from animals larger than the patient. A total of 213 patients met the inclusion criteria. Our study found that trauma patients injured by large animals who are triaged as low priority have dispositions that are not statistically different from those with higher initial prioritization.
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the College of Medicine - Phoenix, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.subjectTraumaen
dc.subjectUnder-triageen
dc.subject.meshAnimals, Wilden
dc.subject.meshWounds and Injuriesen
dc.subject.meshUrban Populationen
dc.subject.meshTriageen
dc.subject.meshInpatientsen
dc.subject.meshPhysiciansen
dc.subject.meshEmergency Service, Hospitalen
dc.subject.meshAdulten
dc.subject.meshChilden
dc.subject.meshTrauma Centersen
dc.subject.meshAnimalsen
dc.subject.meshHorsesen
dc.titleTriage of Trauma Patients Injured By Large Animals: Do Urban Doctors Undertriage?en_US
dc.typetext; Electronic Thesisen
dc.contributor.departmentThe University of Arizona College of Medicine - Phoenixen
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item is part of the College of Medicine - Phoenix Scholarly Projects 2017 collection. For more information, contact the Phoenix Biomedical Campus Library at pbc-library@email.arizona.edu.en_US
dc.contributor.mentorKatz, Ericen
refterms.dateFOA2018-09-11T19:32:10Z
html.description.abstractIn the United States the responsibility to develop criteria for trauma patient’s triage status rests upon individual hospitals rather than the American College of Surgeons. Traumatic injuries from large animals represent a potential need for expanded hospital resources. Urban emergency departments are less likely to regularly see patients with large‐animal related injuries and might be expected to underestimate the predicted injuries. There is scarce research on the topic of initial triage designation for large‐animal related injuries. The aim of this study is to investigate the adequacy of the initial triage designation given to patients presenting with injuries from animals larger than themselves at an urban, safety net, academic Emergency Department and Trauma Center (ACS Level 1 Adult, Level 2 Pediatric). A retrospective chart review was performed on patients presenting to the emergency department (ED) from Jan 2006 until September 2015 with injuries resulting from animals larger than the patient. A total of 213 patients met the inclusion criteria. Our study found that trauma patients injured by large animals who are triaged as low priority have dispositions that are not statistically different from those with higher initial prioritization.


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