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dc.contributor.advisorMatthias, Kathrynen
dc.contributor.authorRadosevich, John
dc.contributor.authorBrunelle, Adam
dc.contributor.authorDiPede, Michael
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-22T18:18:07Z
dc.date.available2017-05-22T18:18:07Z
dc.date.issued2011
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/623574
dc.descriptionClass of 2011 Abstracten
dc.description.abstractOBJECTIVES: The objective of this study was to compare patient clinical outcomes, vascular access line administration complications, and piperacillin-tazobactam costs before and after implementation of an extended infusion piperacillin-tazobactam protocol in adult patients at an academic medical center. METHODS: In this IRB-approved retrospective project, the effect of the implementation of a piperacillin- tazobactam extended infusion protocol at a tertiary care, academic medical center was accessed. The use of piperacillin-tazobactam was accessed during 3 one-month time periods in 2010: Time Period 1 (pre-education and implementation of protocol), Time Period 2 (post-education of pharmacists and infectious disease physicians), and Time Period 3 (post-education of healthcare professionals and implementation of extended-infusion piperacillin- tazobactam protocol). Patients were excluded if piperacillin-tazobactam therapy was prescribed for less than 72 hours. Data collected in each one-month period included demographic data, culture results, number of piperacillin-tazobactam grams prescribed per day, percentage of patients who received extended-infusion piperacillin-tazobactam, other antimicrobial therapy prescribed, medications prescribed with intravenous incompatibilities with piperacillin-tazobactam, number of intravenous line lumens before and after start of piperacillin-tazobactam therapy, length of stay, and all-cause 30 day mortality. RESULTS: During a three step process, the use of extended infusion piperacillin-tazobactam was implemented at an academic medical center after administration approval, education of healthcare professionals, and development of an electronic piperacillin-tazobactam order set. Use of extended-infusion piperacillin-tazobactam protocol significantly decreased the average daily piperacillin-tazobactam dose per patient. CONCLUSION: Implementation of extended-infusion piperacillin-tazobactam protocol for adult patients did significantly decrease the average daily dose of piperacillin-tazobactam per patient (reduced drug cost) but increased vascular access requirements.
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author.en
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
dc.subjectPiperacillin-tazobactamen
dc.subjectPatient Clinical Outcomesen
dc.subject.meshPiperacillin
dc.subject.meshAcademic Medical Centers
dc.subject.meshPatient Outcome Assessment
dc.titleEvaluation of Implementation of Extended-Infusion Piperacillin-Tazobactam at an Academic Medical Centeren_US
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Reporten
dc.contributor.departmentCollege of Pharmacy, The University of Arizonaen
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item is part of the Pharmacy Student Research Projects collection, made available by the College of Pharmacy and the University Libraries at the University of Arizona. For more information about items in this collection, please contact Jennifer Martin, Librarian and Clinical Instructor, Pharmacy Practice and Science, jenmartin@email.arizona.edu.en
html.description.abstractOBJECTIVES: The objective of this study was to compare patient clinical outcomes, vascular access line administration complications, and piperacillin-tazobactam costs before and after implementation of an extended infusion piperacillin-tazobactam protocol in adult patients at an academic medical center. METHODS: In this IRB-approved retrospective project, the effect of the implementation of a piperacillin- tazobactam extended infusion protocol at a tertiary care, academic medical center was accessed. The use of piperacillin-tazobactam was accessed during 3 one-month time periods in 2010: Time Period 1 (pre-education and implementation of protocol), Time Period 2 (post-education of pharmacists and infectious disease physicians), and Time Period 3 (post-education of healthcare professionals and implementation of extended-infusion piperacillin- tazobactam protocol). Patients were excluded if piperacillin-tazobactam therapy was prescribed for less than 72 hours. Data collected in each one-month period included demographic data, culture results, number of piperacillin-tazobactam grams prescribed per day, percentage of patients who received extended-infusion piperacillin-tazobactam, other antimicrobial therapy prescribed, medications prescribed with intravenous incompatibilities with piperacillin-tazobactam, number of intravenous line lumens before and after start of piperacillin-tazobactam therapy, length of stay, and all-cause 30 day mortality. RESULTS: During a three step process, the use of extended infusion piperacillin-tazobactam was implemented at an academic medical center after administration approval, education of healthcare professionals, and development of an electronic piperacillin-tazobactam order set. Use of extended-infusion piperacillin-tazobactam protocol significantly decreased the average daily piperacillin-tazobactam dose per patient. CONCLUSION: Implementation of extended-infusion piperacillin-tazobactam protocol for adult patients did significantly decrease the average daily dose of piperacillin-tazobactam per patient (reduced drug cost) but increased vascular access requirements.


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