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dc.contributor.authorGoulder, Alison
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-26T19:35:23Z
dc.date.available2017-05-26T19:35:23Z
dc.date.issued2017-05-26
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/623629
dc.descriptionA Thesis submitted to The University of Arizona College of Medicine - Phoenix in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the Degree of Doctor of Medicine.en
dc.description.abstractThe human microbiome is the collection of microorganisms in the body that exist in a mutualistic relationship with the host. Recent studies indicate that perturbations in the microbiome may be implicated in a number of diseases, including cancer. More specifically, changes in the gut and vaginal microbiomes may be associated with a variety of gynecologic cancers, including cervical cancer, uterine cancer, and ovarian cancer. Current research and gaps in knowledge regarding the association between the gut and vaginal microbiomes and the development, progression, and treatment of gynecologic cancers are reviewed here. In addition, the potential use of probiotics to manage symptoms of these gynecologic cancers is discussed. A better understanding of how the microbiome composition is altered at these sites and its interaction with the host may aid in prevention, optimization of current therapies, development of new therapeutic agents and/or dosing regimens, and possibly limit the side effects associated with cancer treatment.
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the College of Medicine - Phoenix, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.subjectMicrobiomeen
dc.subjectVaginal Microbiomeen
dc.subjectHuman Papilloma Virus (HPV)en
dc.subject.meshGastrointestinal Microbiomeen
dc.subject.meshProbioticsen
dc.subject.meshDysbiosisen
dc.subject.meshMicrobiotaen
dc.subject.meshGenital Diseases, Femaleen
dc.subject.meshNeoplasmsen
dc.subject.meshTherapeutic Irrigationen
dc.subject.meshBiomarkersen
dc.subject.meshUterine Cervical Neoplasmsen
dc.subject.meshUterine Cervical Dysplasiaen
dc.subject.meshImmunologic Factorsen
dc.subject.meshPapillomaviridaeen
dc.titleThe Vaginal and Gastrointestinal Microbiomes in Gynecologic Cancers: A Review of Applications in Etiology, Symptoms and Treatmenten_US
dc.title.alternativeSignatures of Cervicovaginal Inflammation in Patients over the Course of Cervical Carcinogenesisen
dc.typetext; Electronic Thesisen
dc.contributor.departmentThe University of Arizona College of Medicine - Phoenixen
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item is part of the College of Medicine - Phoenix Scholarly Projects 2017 collection. For more information, contact the Phoenix Biomedical Campus Library at pbc-library@email.arizona.edu.en_US
dc.contributor.mentorChase, Danaen
refterms.dateFOA2018-09-11T19:39:19Z
html.description.abstractThe human microbiome is the collection of microorganisms in the body that exist in a mutualistic relationship with the host. Recent studies indicate that perturbations in the microbiome may be implicated in a number of diseases, including cancer. More specifically, changes in the gut and vaginal microbiomes may be associated with a variety of gynecologic cancers, including cervical cancer, uterine cancer, and ovarian cancer. Current research and gaps in knowledge regarding the association between the gut and vaginal microbiomes and the development, progression, and treatment of gynecologic cancers are reviewed here. In addition, the potential use of probiotics to manage symptoms of these gynecologic cancers is discussed. A better understanding of how the microbiome composition is altered at these sites and its interaction with the host may aid in prevention, optimization of current therapies, development of new therapeutic agents and/or dosing regimens, and possibly limit the side effects associated with cancer treatment.


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