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dc.contributor.advisorLee, Daviden
dc.contributor.authorEsch, Jennifer
dc.contributor.authorSandoval, Guadalupe
dc.date.accessioned2017-06-01T20:12:06Z
dc.date.available2017-06-01T20:12:06Z
dc.date.issued2010
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/623792
dc.descriptionClass of 2010 Abstracten
dc.description.abstractOBJECTIVES: The purpose of the study was to determine the knowledge of third year pharmacy students about the safety of certain medications during pregnancy and to assess their awareness of an important resource available on medication safety. METHODS: The study used an analytical cross-­‐sectional design. A pre-­‐test was administered to determine baseline knowledge. Dee Quinn provided a presentation on teratogens. The same test was then administered as a post-­‐test to assess the amount of knowledge gained from the presentation. The pre and post-­‐tests were matched for data analysis. A mean and standard deviation were developed for pre and post-­‐test data and the results were compared to each other using a t-­‐test for dependent groups. RESULTS: Students showed a significant increase in knowledge after the presentation (p<0.0001). 78% of students had improved scores after the presentation. 100% of students felt that pharmacists could help make a difference in preventing malformations due to teratogen exposure. There was no significant difference between men and women or students with children and without children. Work experience did not affect knowledge scores. 64% of students felt more comfortable counseling pregnant patients after the presentation. Awareness of the Teratology Information Service improved after the presentation. CONCLUSIONS: After the presentation, students rated themselves as more comfortable speaking with pregnant patients and showed improved knowledge of teratogens. Gender, being a parent and work experience had no relevance on knowledge scores. The investigators recommend that this presentation be given to all students at the College of Pharmacy to improve knowledge in this area.
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author.en
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
dc.subjectPregnancyen
dc.subjectTeratogensen
dc.subjectMedication Safetyen
dc.subjectPharmacy Studentsen
dc.subject.meshPregnancyen
dc.subject.meshTeratogensen
dc.subject.meshStudents, Pharmacyen
dc.titlePharmacy Student Knowledge of Teratogens to Avoid in Pregnancyen_US
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Reporten
dc.contributor.departmentCollege of Pharmacy, The University of Arizonaen
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item is part of the Pharmacy Student Research Projects collection, made available by the College of Pharmacy and the University Libraries at the University of Arizona. For more information about items in this collection, please contact Jennifer Martin, Librarian and Clinical Instructor, Pharmacy Practice and Science, jenmartin@email.arizona.edu.en
html.description.abstractOBJECTIVES: The purpose of the study was to determine the knowledge of third year pharmacy students about the safety of certain medications during pregnancy and to assess their awareness of an important resource available on medication safety. METHODS: The study used an analytical cross-­‐sectional design. A pre-­‐test was administered to determine baseline knowledge. Dee Quinn provided a presentation on teratogens. The same test was then administered as a post-­‐test to assess the amount of knowledge gained from the presentation. The pre and post-­‐tests were matched for data analysis. A mean and standard deviation were developed for pre and post-­‐test data and the results were compared to each other using a t-­‐test for dependent groups. RESULTS: Students showed a significant increase in knowledge after the presentation (p<0.0001). 78% of students had improved scores after the presentation. 100% of students felt that pharmacists could help make a difference in preventing malformations due to teratogen exposure. There was no significant difference between men and women or students with children and without children. Work experience did not affect knowledge scores. 64% of students felt more comfortable counseling pregnant patients after the presentation. Awareness of the Teratology Information Service improved after the presentation. CONCLUSIONS: After the presentation, students rated themselves as more comfortable speaking with pregnant patients and showed improved knowledge of teratogens. Gender, being a parent and work experience had no relevance on knowledge scores. The investigators recommend that this presentation be given to all students at the College of Pharmacy to improve knowledge in this area.


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