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dc.contributor.authorZuniga-Teran, Adriana A.
dc.contributor.authorOrr, Barron J.
dc.contributor.authorGimblett, Randy H.
dc.contributor.authorChalfoun, Nader V.
dc.contributor.authorMarsh, Stuart E.
dc.contributor.authorGuertin, David P.
dc.contributor.authorGoing, Scott B.
dc.date.accessioned2017-06-02T22:18:07Z
dc.date.available2017-06-02T22:18:07Z
dc.date.issued2017-03
dc.identifier.citationDesigning healthy communities: Testing the walkability model 2017, 6 (1):63 Frontiers of Architectural Researchen
dc.identifier.issn20952635
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.foar.2016.11.005
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/623869
dc.description.abstractResearch from multiple domains has provided insights into how neighborhood design can be improved to have a more favorable effect on physical activity, a concept known as walkability. The relevant research findings/hypotheses have been integrated into a Walkability Framework, which organizes the design elements into nine walkability categories. The purpose of this study was to test whether this conceptual framework can be used as a model to measure the interactions between the built environment and physical activity. We explored correlations between the walkability categories and physical activity reported through a survey of residents of Tucson, Arizona (n=486). The results include significant correlations between the walkability categories and physical activity as well as between the walkability categories and the two motivations for walking (recreation and transportation). To our knowledge, this is the first study that reports links between walkability and walking for recreation. Additionally, the use of the Walkability Framework allowed us to identify the walkability categories most strongly correlated with the two motivations for walking. The results of this study support the use of the Walkability Framework as a model to measure the built environment in relation to its ability to promote physical activity. (C) 2017 The Authors.
dc.description.sponsorshipConsejo Nacional de Ciencia y Tecnologia (CONACYT - Mexican government); Wilderness Society; University of Arizonaen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherELSEVIER SCIENCE BVen
dc.relation.urlhttp://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S2095263516300656en
dc.rights© 2016 Higher Education Press Limited Company. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V.en
dc.subjectWalkabilityen
dc.subjectPhysical activityen
dc.subjectBuilt environmenten
dc.subjectLEED-NDen
dc.subjectNeighborhood designen
dc.titleDesigning healthy communities: Testing the walkability modelen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Arizona, Udall Ctr Studies Publ Policyen
dc.identifier.journalFrontiers of Architectural Researchen
dc.description.noteOpen Access Journal.en
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en
dc.eprint.versionFinal published versionen
refterms.dateFOA2018-09-11T19:52:12Z
html.description.abstractResearch from multiple domains has provided insights into how neighborhood design can be improved to have a more favorable effect on physical activity, a concept known as walkability. The relevant research findings/hypotheses have been integrated into a Walkability Framework, which organizes the design elements into nine walkability categories. The purpose of this study was to test whether this conceptual framework can be used as a model to measure the interactions between the built environment and physical activity. We explored correlations between the walkability categories and physical activity reported through a survey of residents of Tucson, Arizona (n=486). The results include significant correlations between the walkability categories and physical activity as well as between the walkability categories and the two motivations for walking (recreation and transportation). To our knowledge, this is the first study that reports links between walkability and walking for recreation. Additionally, the use of the Walkability Framework allowed us to identify the walkability categories most strongly correlated with the two motivations for walking. The results of this study support the use of the Walkability Framework as a model to measure the built environment in relation to its ability to promote physical activity. (C) 2017 The Authors.


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