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dc.contributor.advisorMurphy, Johnen
dc.contributor.advisorTomasa, Lynnen
dc.contributor.authorHegarty, Kelly
dc.contributor.authorMarrs, Cydney
dc.date.accessioned2017-06-05T16:10:13Z
dc.date.available2017-06-05T16:10:13Z
dc.date.issued2010
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/623881
dc.descriptionClass of 2010 Abstracten
dc.description.abstractOBJECTIVES: To examine the potential differences in attitudes between the colleges of pharmacy, nursing, medicine, and social work relating to the “Culture and Communication” IPE activity at the University of Arizona in 2007. METHODS: This was a retrospective study comparing the opinions and attitudes of different groups of healthcare students concerning the IPE activity “Culture and Communication” at the University of Arizona. The independent variable in this study was academic discipline: medicine, pharmacy, nursing, law, or social work. The dependent variables were the attitudes and opinions of the effectiveness of this IPE activity on Culture and Communication. RESULTS: A total of 589 questionnaires (medicine=119, pharmacy=89, nursing=77, social work=21) were completed and included in 2007. Overall, students felt the Culture and Communication IPE activity improved their knowledge of how to identify barriers to communication and reduce the likelihood of miscommunication with other healthcare professionals. The percent of students who believed they had a very high understanding of the barriers to effective communication among health care providers increased from 11.3% before the IPE activity to 34.5% after. The percent of students who believed they had a very high knowledge of how to reduce the likelihood of miscommunication increased from 6.6% before the IPE activity to 37.4% after. There were differences between the groups relating to the different questions that the questionnaire focused on. CONCLUSIONS: There were significant differences between the various healthcare professionals relating to the usefulness and effectiveness of the Culture and Communication IPE activities at the University of Arizona. Overall, students seemed to benefit from and enjoy the IPE activity and would recommend having future students participate in the activities. The majority of students felt the Culture and Communication IPE activity was benificial and allowed for the improvement of relationships and attitudes between the health care professions. There were similar responses between the medicine, nursing, pharmacy, and social work students.
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author.en
dc.subjectInterprofessional Educationen
dc.subjectHealthcare Professionalsen
dc.subject.meshInterprofessional Relationsen
dc.titlePerspectives on Interprofessional Education: Communication and Cultureen_US
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Reporten
dc.contributor.departmentCollege of Pharmacy, The University of Arizonaen
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item is part of the Pharmacy Student Research Projects collection, made available by the College of Pharmacy and the University Libraries at the University of Arizona. For more information about items in this collection, please contact Jennifer Martin, Associate Librarian and Clinical Instructor, Pharmacy Practice and Science, jenmartin@email.arizona.edu.en
html.description.abstractOBJECTIVES: To examine the potential differences in attitudes between the colleges of pharmacy, nursing, medicine, and social work relating to the “Culture and Communication” IPE activity at the University of Arizona in 2007. METHODS: This was a retrospective study comparing the opinions and attitudes of different groups of healthcare students concerning the IPE activity “Culture and Communication” at the University of Arizona. The independent variable in this study was academic discipline: medicine, pharmacy, nursing, law, or social work. The dependent variables were the attitudes and opinions of the effectiveness of this IPE activity on Culture and Communication. RESULTS: A total of 589 questionnaires (medicine=119, pharmacy=89, nursing=77, social work=21) were completed and included in 2007. Overall, students felt the Culture and Communication IPE activity improved their knowledge of how to identify barriers to communication and reduce the likelihood of miscommunication with other healthcare professionals. The percent of students who believed they had a very high understanding of the barriers to effective communication among health care providers increased from 11.3% before the IPE activity to 34.5% after. The percent of students who believed they had a very high knowledge of how to reduce the likelihood of miscommunication increased from 6.6% before the IPE activity to 37.4% after. There were differences between the groups relating to the different questions that the questionnaire focused on. CONCLUSIONS: There were significant differences between the various healthcare professionals relating to the usefulness and effectiveness of the Culture and Communication IPE activities at the University of Arizona. Overall, students seemed to benefit from and enjoy the IPE activity and would recommend having future students participate in the activities. The majority of students felt the Culture and Communication IPE activity was benificial and allowed for the improvement of relationships and attitudes between the health care professions. There were similar responses between the medicine, nursing, pharmacy, and social work students.


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