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dc.contributor.authorSmith, Nathan
dc.contributor.authorKilpatrick, Charles D.
dc.contributor.authorMauerhan, Jon C.
dc.contributor.authorAndrews, Jennifer E.
dc.contributor.authorMargutti, Raffaella
dc.contributor.authorFong, Wen-Fai
dc.contributor.authorGraham, Melissa L.
dc.contributor.authorZheng, WeiKang
dc.contributor.authorKelly, Patrick L.
dc.contributor.authorFilippenko, Alexei V.
dc.contributor.authorFox, Ori D.
dc.date.accessioned2017-06-05T23:00:57Z
dc.date.available2017-06-05T23:00:57Z
dc.date.issued2017-04-21
dc.identifier.citationEndurance of SN 2005ip after a decade: X-rays, radio and Hα like SN 1988Z require long-lived pre-supernova mass-loss 2017, 466 (3):3021 Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Societyen
dc.identifier.issn0035-8711
dc.identifier.issn1365-2966
dc.identifier.doi10.1093/mnras/stw3204
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/623937
dc.description.abstractSupernova (SN) 2005ip was a Type IIn event notable for its sustained strong interaction with circumstellar material (CSM), coronal emission lines and infrared (IR) excess, interpreted as shock interaction with the very dense and clumpy wind of an extreme red supergiant. We present a series of late- time spectra of SN 2005ip and a first radio detection of this SN, plus late-time X-rays, all of which indicate that its CSM interaction is still strong a decade post- explosion. We also present and discuss new spectra of geriatric SNe with continued CSM interaction: SN 1988Z, SN 1993J and SN 1998S. From 3 to 10 yr post- explosion, SN 2005ip's Ha luminosity and other observed characteristics were nearly identical to those of the radio- luminous SN 1988Z, and much more luminous than SNe 1993J and 1998S. At 10 yr after explosion, SN 2005ip showed a drop in Ha luminosity, followed by a quick resurgence over several months. We interpret this Ha variability as ejecta crashing into a dense shell located less than or similar to 0.05 pc from the star, which may be the same shell that caused the IR echo at earlier epochs. The extreme Ha luminosities in SN 2005ip and SN 1988Z are still dominated by the forward shock at 10 yr post- explosion, whereas SN 1993J and SN 1998S are dominated by the reverse shock at a similar age. Continuous strong CSM interaction in SNe 2005ip and 1988Z is indicative of enhanced mass- loss for similar to 10(3) yr before core collapse, longer than Ne, O or Si burning phases. Instead, the episodic mass- loss must extend back through C burning and perhaps even part of He burning.
dc.description.sponsorshipNSF [AST-1210599, AST-1312221, AST-1211916]; NASA [1255094]; NASA through an Einstein Postdoctoral Fellowship; Gary & Cynthia Bengier; Richard & Rhoda Goldman Fund; Christopher R. Redlich Fund; TABASGO Foundation; W. M. Keck Foundationen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherOXFORD UNIV PRESSen
dc.relation.urlhttps://academic.oup.com/mnras/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/mnras/stw3204en
dc.rights© 2016 The Authors Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Royal Astronomical Societyen
dc.subjectcircumstellar matteren
dc.subjectstars: evolutionen
dc.subjectsupernovae: generalen
dc.subjectsupernovae: individual: SN 2005ipen
dc.subjectstars: winds, outflowsen
dc.titleEndurance of SN 2005ip after a decade: X-rays, radio and Hα like SN 1988Z require long-lived pre-supernova mass-lossen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Arizona, Steward Observen
dc.identifier.journalMonthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Societyen
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en
dc.eprint.versionFinal published versionen
refterms.dateFOA2018-07-14T23:28:00Z
html.description.abstractSupernova (SN) 2005ip was a Type IIn event notable for its sustained strong interaction with circumstellar material (CSM), coronal emission lines and infrared (IR) excess, interpreted as shock interaction with the very dense and clumpy wind of an extreme red supergiant. We present a series of late- time spectra of SN 2005ip and a first radio detection of this SN, plus late-time X-rays, all of which indicate that its CSM interaction is still strong a decade post- explosion. We also present and discuss new spectra of geriatric SNe with continued CSM interaction: SN 1988Z, SN 1993J and SN 1998S. From 3 to 10 yr post- explosion, SN 2005ip's Ha luminosity and other observed characteristics were nearly identical to those of the radio- luminous SN 1988Z, and much more luminous than SNe 1993J and 1998S. At 10 yr after explosion, SN 2005ip showed a drop in Ha luminosity, followed by a quick resurgence over several months. We interpret this Ha variability as ejecta crashing into a dense shell located less than or similar to 0.05 pc from the star, which may be the same shell that caused the IR echo at earlier epochs. The extreme Ha luminosities in SN 2005ip and SN 1988Z are still dominated by the forward shock at 10 yr post- explosion, whereas SN 1993J and SN 1998S are dominated by the reverse shock at a similar age. Continuous strong CSM interaction in SNe 2005ip and 1988Z is indicative of enhanced mass- loss for similar to 10(3) yr before core collapse, longer than Ne, O or Si burning phases. Instead, the episodic mass- loss must extend back through C burning and perhaps even part of He burning.


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