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dc.contributor.authorMoseley, Joseph
dc.date.accessioned2017-06-06T20:17:48Z
dc.date.available2017-06-06T20:17:48Z
dc.date.issued2017-06-06
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/623987
dc.descriptionA Thesis submitted to The University of Arizona College of Medicine - Phoenix in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the Degree of Doctor of Medicine.en
dc.description.abstractWhile it is known that over 266,000 Arizonans enrolled in health coverage through the federal Marketplace and Medicaid from October 2013 through May 2014, little analysis has been performed to examine whether enrollment by diverse racial and ethnic groups sufficiently reduced disparities in coverage. We obtained publicly available data from the Census Bureau comparing rates of uninsured by race/ethnicity from 2013 to 2014 in Arizona from the American Community Survey. The uninsured rate in Arizona for the total civilian no institutionalized population dropped from 17% in 2013 to 13.6% in 2014. The uninsured rate in Arizona for whites declined from 15.7% to 12.2%, for African Americans declined from 17.4% to 11.1%, for American Indian/Alaskan Natives declined from 26.9% to 24.1%, for Asian Americans declined from 15.1% to 11.0% and for Hispanic/Latino declined from 27.5% to 22.2%. We conducted interviews with nine community organizations in order to identify barriers that must be addressed moving forward to lessen insurance coverage disparities among various minority groups. Technological literacy and functionality, lack of funding, lack of personnel, physical vastness of many populations, language, and cultural differences were commonly identified as barriers to enrollment. Mistrust of government and confusion regarding the specific provisions within the ACA pertaining to Native individuals were also cited.
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the College of Medicine - Phoenix, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.subjectObamacareen
dc.subjectACAen
dc.subjectAffordable Care Acten
dc.subject.meshPatient Protection and Affordable Care Acten
dc.subject.meshInsurance, Healthen
dc.subject.meshHealth Services Accessibilityen
dc.subject.meshQuality of Health Careen
dc.subject.meshHealth Insurance Exchangesen
dc.subject.meshCultural Diversityen
dc.subject.meshMedicaiden
dc.subject.meshMedically Uninsureden
dc.subject.meshHealth Care Quality, Access, and Evaluationen
dc.subject.meshArizonaen
dc.subject.meshIndians, North Americanen
dc.subject.meshHispanic Americansen
dc.subject.meshAfrican Americansen
dc.subject.meshAsian Americansen
dc.subject.meshAlaska Nativesen
dc.subject.meshMinority Groupsen
dc.subject.meshHealthcare Disparitiesen
dc.subject.meshSurveys and Questionnairesen
dc.subject.meshCommunity Health Planningen
dc.titleIdentifying Barriers to Enrollment of Diverse Populations in Arizona Following the Initial Open Enrollment Period of the Affordable Care Acten_US
dc.typetext; Electronic Thesisen
dc.contributor.departmentThe University of Arizona College of Medicine - Phoenixen
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item is part of the College of Medicine - Phoenix Scholarly Projects 2017 collection. For more information, contact the Phoenix Biomedical Campus Library at pbc-library@email.arizona.edu.en_US
dc.contributor.mentorVanPelt, Kimen
refterms.dateFOA2018-06-12T23:10:17Z
html.description.abstractWhile it is known that over 266,000 Arizonans enrolled in health coverage through the federal Marketplace and Medicaid from October 2013 through May 2014, little analysis has been performed to examine whether enrollment by diverse racial and ethnic groups sufficiently reduced disparities in coverage. We obtained publicly available data from the Census Bureau comparing rates of uninsured by race/ethnicity from 2013 to 2014 in Arizona from the American Community Survey. The uninsured rate in Arizona for the total civilian no institutionalized population dropped from 17% in 2013 to 13.6% in 2014. The uninsured rate in Arizona for whites declined from 15.7% to 12.2%, for African Americans declined from 17.4% to 11.1%, for American Indian/Alaskan Natives declined from 26.9% to 24.1%, for Asian Americans declined from 15.1% to 11.0% and for Hispanic/Latino declined from 27.5% to 22.2%. We conducted interviews with nine community organizations in order to identify barriers that must be addressed moving forward to lessen insurance coverage disparities among various minority groups. Technological literacy and functionality, lack of funding, lack of personnel, physical vastness of many populations, language, and cultural differences were commonly identified as barriers to enrollment. Mistrust of government and confusion regarding the specific provisions within the ACA pertaining to Native individuals were also cited.


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