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dc.contributor.authorCooley, Janet
dc.contributor.authorStolpe, Samuel F
dc.contributor.authorMontoya, Amber
dc.contributor.authorWalsh, Angela
dc.contributor.authorHincapie, Ana L
dc.contributor.authorArya, Vibhuti
dc.contributor.authorNelson, Melissa L
dc.contributor.authorWarholak, Terri
dc.date.accessioned2017-06-08T16:55:59Z
dc.date.available2017-06-08T16:55:59Z
dc.date.issued2017-04
dc.identifier.citationAn Analysis of Quality Improvement Education at US Colleges of Pharmacy. 2017, 81 (3):51 Am J Pharm Educen
dc.identifier.issn1553-6467
dc.identifier.pmid28496271
dc.identifier.doi10.5688/ajpe81351
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/624022
dc.description.abstractObjective. Analyze quality improvement (QI) education across US pharmacy programs. Methods. This was a two stage cross-sectional study that inspected each accredited school website for published QI curriculum or related content, and e-mailed a questionnaire to each school asking about QI curriculum or content. T-test and chi square were used for analysis with an alpha a priori set at .05. Results. Sixty responses (47% response rate) revealed the least-covered QI topics: quality dashboards /sentinel systems (30%); six-sigma or other QI methodologies (45%); safety and quality measures (57%); Medicare Star measures and payment incentives (58%); and how to implement changes to improve quality (60%). More private institutions covered Adverse Drug Events than public institutions and required a dedicated QI class; however, required QI projects were more often reported by public institutions. Conclusion. Despite the need for pharmacists to understand QI, it is not covered well in school curricula.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherAMER ASSOC COLL PHARMACYen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.ajpe.org/doi/full/10.5688/ajpe81351en
dc.relation.urlhttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5423067/en
dc.rights© 2017 American Association of Colleges of Pharmacyen
dc.subjectquality improvementen
dc.subjectquality measurementen
dc.subjectquality controlen
dc.subjectsafetyen
dc.subjectmedication error reductionen
dc.titleAn Analysis of Quality Improvement Education at US Colleges of Pharmacy.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Arizona, Coll Pharmen
dc.identifier.journalAmerican journal of pharmaceutical educationen
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en
dc.eprint.versionFinal published versionen
refterms.dateFOA2018-06-12T12:56:39Z
html.description.abstractObjective. Analyze quality improvement (QI) education across US pharmacy programs. Methods. This was a two stage cross-sectional study that inspected each accredited school website for published QI curriculum or related content, and e-mailed a questionnaire to each school asking about QI curriculum or content. T-test and chi square were used for analysis with an alpha a priori set at .05. Results. Sixty responses (47% response rate) revealed the least-covered QI topics: quality dashboards /sentinel systems (30%); six-sigma or other QI methodologies (45%); safety and quality measures (57%); Medicare Star measures and payment incentives (58%); and how to implement changes to improve quality (60%). More private institutions covered Adverse Drug Events than public institutions and required a dedicated QI class; however, required QI projects were more often reported by public institutions. Conclusion. Despite the need for pharmacists to understand QI, it is not covered well in school curricula.


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