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dc.contributor.authorUssishkin, Adam
dc.contributor.authorWarner, Natasha
dc.contributor.authorClayton, Ian
dc.contributor.authorBrenner, Daniel
dc.contributor.authorCarnie, Andrew
dc.contributor.authorHammond, Michael
dc.contributor.authorFisher, Muriel
dc.date.accessioned2017-06-08T18:37:21Z
dc.date.available2017-06-08T18:37:21Z
dc.date.issued2017-04-12
dc.identifier.citationLexical representation and processing of word-initial morphological alternations: Scottish Gaelic mutation 2017, 8 (1):8 Laboratory Phonologyen
dc.identifier.issn1868-6354
dc.identifier.issn1868-6354
dc.identifier.doi10.5334/labphon.22
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/624038
dc.description.abstractWhen hearing speech, listeners begin recognizing words before reaching the end of the word. Therefore, early sounds impact spoken word recognition before sounds later in the word. In languages like English, most morphophonological alternations affect the ends of words, but in some languages, morphophonology can alter the early sounds of a word. Scottish Gaelic, an endangered language, has a pattern of 'initial consonant mutation' that changes initial consonants: Pog 'kiss' begins with [ph], but phog 'kissed' begins with [f]. This raises questions both of how listeners process words that might begin with a mutated consonant during spoken word recognition, and how listeners relate the mutated and unmutated forms to each other in the lexicon. We present three experiments to investigate these questions. A priming experiment shows that native speakers link the mutated and unmutated forms in the lexicon. A gating experiment shows that Gaelic listeners usually do not consider mutated forms as candidates during lexical recognition until there is enough evidence to force that interpretation. However, a phonetic identification experiment confirms that listeners can identify the mutated sounds correctly. Together, these experiments contribute to our understanding of how speakers represent and process a language with morphophonological alternations at word onset.
dc.description.sponsorshipNational Science Foundation [BCS11443818]en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherUBIQUITY PRESS LTDen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.journal-labphon.org/article/10.5334/labphon.22/en
dc.rights© 2017 The Author(s). This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (CC-BY 4.0).en
dc.subjectspoken word recognitionen
dc.subjectmorphophonologyen
dc.subjectGaelicen
dc.titleLexical representation and processing of word-initial morphological alternations: Scottish Gaelic mutationen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Arizona, Dept Linguisten
dc.identifier.journalLaboratory Phonologyen
dc.description.noteOpen Access Journalen
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en
dc.eprint.versionFinal published versionen
refterms.dateFOA2018-09-11T19:58:12Z
html.description.abstractWhen hearing speech, listeners begin recognizing words before reaching the end of the word. Therefore, early sounds impact spoken word recognition before sounds later in the word. In languages like English, most morphophonological alternations affect the ends of words, but in some languages, morphophonology can alter the early sounds of a word. Scottish Gaelic, an endangered language, has a pattern of 'initial consonant mutation' that changes initial consonants: Pog 'kiss' begins with [ph], but phog 'kissed' begins with [f]. This raises questions both of how listeners process words that might begin with a mutated consonant during spoken word recognition, and how listeners relate the mutated and unmutated forms to each other in the lexicon. We present three experiments to investigate these questions. A priming experiment shows that native speakers link the mutated and unmutated forms in the lexicon. A gating experiment shows that Gaelic listeners usually do not consider mutated forms as candidates during lexical recognition until there is enough evidence to force that interpretation. However, a phonetic identification experiment confirms that listeners can identify the mutated sounds correctly. Together, these experiments contribute to our understanding of how speakers represent and process a language with morphophonological alternations at word onset.


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