Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorMars, Matthew M.en
dc.contributor.authorPhillips, Cassandra Kay
dc.creatorPhillips, Cassandra Kayen
dc.date.accessioned2017-06-14T16:44:24Z
dc.date.available2017-06-14T16:44:24Z
dc.date.issued2017
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/624143
dc.description.abstractResearch specific to the agriculture literacy of adult learners and, more specifically, college students, is warranted (Kovar & Ball, 2013). In the current study, I analyze the sources of knowledge that are dispersed across formal, non-formal, and informal learning settings that college students rely on to understand the various components of food systems. More specifically, I ask here, "How do college students learn about food systems?" Data were collected using a convenience sample of undergraduate students at a large research-intensive university who responded to an authentic questionnaire developed specifically for this study. Findings indicate that there is little variation between the three learning settings with respect to food system knowledge. This indicates that education with respect to food system knowledge is lacking. Implications of the study include recommendations for the development and refinement of formal and non-formal food systems curricula specific to the needs, backgrounds, and experiences of undergraduate college students.
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.subjectagriculture knowledge acquisitionen
dc.subjectcollegiate agriculture literacyen
dc.subjectfood systemsen
dc.titleHow Do College Students Learn About Food Systems?: A Descriptive Analysisen_US
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
thesis.degree.levelmastersen
dc.contributor.committeememberMars, Matthew M.en
dc.contributor.committeememberTorres, Robert M.en
dc.contributor.committeememberRice, Amber H.en
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen
thesis.degree.disciplineAgricultural Educationen
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en
refterms.dateFOA2018-07-01T14:10:06Z
html.description.abstractResearch specific to the agriculture literacy of adult learners and, more specifically, college students, is warranted (Kovar & Ball, 2013). In the current study, I analyze the sources of knowledge that are dispersed across formal, non-formal, and informal learning settings that college students rely on to understand the various components of food systems. More specifically, I ask here, "How do college students learn about food systems?" Data were collected using a convenience sample of undergraduate students at a large research-intensive university who responded to an authentic questionnaire developed specifically for this study. Findings indicate that there is little variation between the three learning settings with respect to food system knowledge. This indicates that education with respect to food system knowledge is lacking. Implications of the study include recommendations for the development and refinement of formal and non-formal food systems curricula specific to the needs, backgrounds, and experiences of undergraduate college students.


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Name:
azu_etd_15552_sip1_m.pdf
Size:
232.1Kb
Format:
PDF

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record