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dc.contributor.advisorHall-Lipsy, Elizabethen
dc.contributor.authorLeutz, Kenneth*
dc.contributor.authorElmer, Cody*
dc.contributor.authorElmer, Sarah*
dc.date.accessioned2017-06-15T17:15:28Z
dc.date.available2017-06-15T17:15:28Z
dc.date.issued2017
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/624172
dc.descriptionClass of 2017 Abstracten
dc.description.abstractObjectives: To assess access to and quality of primary health care services by individuals receiving meals at a food bank in a rural location using the Primary Care Assessment Tool- Short Form (PCAT-S). Also, to investigate whether individuals with a mental health condition at a rural community food bank receive different care compared to those without a mental health condition. Methods: The PCAT-S, a survey developed by John Hopkins University, was administered to evaluate care at first contact, ongoing care, coordination of care, and comprehensiveness of care. Demographics data (age, gender, health conditions, insurance status, etc.) was also collected. Results: The majority of our participants surveyed lived within an urban zip code (84.8%), had government insurance (81.4%), were male (61.9%), or were Native American (45%). The groups with the highest mean PCAT-S scores were participants with diabetes (mean score= 96.8), participants with no insurance (94.63), and participants who were female (91). The patient populations with the lowest scores were those with less than a high school education (63.11) with serious mental illness (64), or who had bipolar disorder (69). Groups with higher mean PCAT-S scores indicated more involvement with a primary care provider or overall better care within that section of the PCAT-S. Conclusions: Participants with a mental health condition may be receiving less healthcare than those without a mental health condition, especially in the coordination of care between healthcare services, as indicated by lower mean PCAT-S scores. Those living in a rural community, among our population, do not appear to be receiving less healthcare than those in an urban setting.
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author.en
dc.subjectMental Illnessen
dc.subjectPrimary Medical Careen
dc.subjectRural Healthcareen
dc.subject.meshMental Disordersen
dc.subject.meshPrimary Health Careen
dc.subject.meshRural Health Servicesen
dc.titleAccess to Primary Medical Care among Patients with and without Mental Illness in a Rural Settingen_US
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Reporten
dc.contributor.departmentCollege of Pharmacy, The University of Arizonaen
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item is part of the Pharmacy Student Research Projects collection, made available by the College of Pharmacy and the University Libraries at the University of Arizona. For more information about items in this collection, please contact Jennifer Martin, Associate Librarian and Clinical Instructor, Pharmacy Practice and Science, jenmartin@email.arizona.edu.en
html.description.abstractObjectives: To assess access to and quality of primary health care services by individuals receiving meals at a food bank in a rural location using the Primary Care Assessment Tool- Short Form (PCAT-S). Also, to investigate whether individuals with a mental health condition at a rural community food bank receive different care compared to those without a mental health condition. Methods: The PCAT-S, a survey developed by John Hopkins University, was administered to evaluate care at first contact, ongoing care, coordination of care, and comprehensiveness of care. Demographics data (age, gender, health conditions, insurance status, etc.) was also collected. Results: The majority of our participants surveyed lived within an urban zip code (84.8%), had government insurance (81.4%), were male (61.9%), or were Native American (45%). The groups with the highest mean PCAT-S scores were participants with diabetes (mean score= 96.8), participants with no insurance (94.63), and participants who were female (91). The patient populations with the lowest scores were those with less than a high school education (63.11) with serious mental illness (64), or who had bipolar disorder (69). Groups with higher mean PCAT-S scores indicated more involvement with a primary care provider or overall better care within that section of the PCAT-S. Conclusions: Participants with a mental health condition may be receiving less healthcare than those without a mental health condition, especially in the coordination of care between healthcare services, as indicated by lower mean PCAT-S scores. Those living in a rural community, among our population, do not appear to be receiving less healthcare than those in an urban setting.


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