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dc.contributor.advisorLee, Jeannieen
dc.contributor.authorFlath, Ali
dc.contributor.authorHwang, Mandy
dc.contributor.authorNguyen, Yen
dc.date.accessioned2017-06-15T17:41:00Z
dc.date.available2017-06-15T17:41:00Z
dc.date.issued2017
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/624175
dc.descriptionClass of 2017 Abstracten
dc.description.abstractObjectives: To assess older adults’ knowledge of prescription pain and over-the-counter (OTC) medications, to determine if age influences older adults’ choice of OTC pain agents, and to determine if education by a pharmacist about prescription and OTC pain medications impacts the score on a medication knowledge indicator. Methods: This is a descriptive survey study. Participants received a recruitment email with a consent link in order to participate in the secure, online Qualtrics survey. The survey consists of 10 knowledge-based items on pain medications and 12 demographic items. The primary outcome of this study is the knowledge about pain medications of adult 75 years and older. Knowledge scores were analyzed using a Chi square test to compare the proportion of respondents in each age group who score 50% or more. The secondary outcome is the purchase pattern of OTC pain medications based on age. OTC purchasing data was analyzed using a nonparametric regression test. The tertiary outcome is the effect of pharmacist counseling on patients knowledge of prescription and OTC medications. The knowledge indicator scores were compared in patients who reported as either being educated by a pharmacist or not using a one-way ANOVA test. Results: The questionnaire was completed by a total of 50 people, but three were excluded due to not meeting the age requirement of 50 years and older. Forty-seven participants were used in the analysis with mean age of 68.3 years (range 55 to 90) and 72% female. Of 44 participants who completed the entire survey those 75 years and older scored better on the knowledge indicator (71% scored ≥50%) compared with those 74 years and younger (54% scored ≥50%); however, no significant difference was found (p = 0.28). In addition, purchasing pattern based on percentage of both prescription and OTC medications between both groups appeared to be insignificantly different (p = 0.31 and 0.51 respectively). The mean number of OTC medications purchased equaled the mean number of OTC medications purchased for adults less than 75 years of age (Y = 1.2 vs. 1.2 medications per patient, p=0.51). Finally, all patients age 75 and older that reported being educated by a pharmacist scored 50% or greater on the knowledge indicator (100%) while 52% of participants 74 years and younger scored 50% or greater (p = 0.673). Conclusions: Adults ages 75 years and older possess the same basic knowledge of pain medications when compared to adults age 50 to 74. In addition, adults age 75 years and older purchase over-the-counter (OTC) at the same rate as adults age 50 to 74. Finally, adults age 75 years and older benefit most from pharmacist consultation compared to adults age 50 to 74.
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author.en
dc.subjectOver-the-Counter (OTC)en
dc.subjectPrescription Medicationen
dc.subjectOlder Adultsen
dc.subjectPatient Knowledgeen
dc.subject.meshNonprescription Drugsen
dc.subject.meshPrescription Drugsen
dc.subject.meshAdultsen
dc.subject.meshAgeden
dc.subject.meshPatient Medication Knowledgeen
dc.titleAssessment of the General Knowledge of Prescription and Over-The-Counter (OTC) Pain Medications in Older Adultsen_US
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Reporten
dc.contributor.departmentCollege of Pharmacy, The University of Arizonaen
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item is part of the Pharmacy Student Research Projects collection, made available by the College of Pharmacy and the University Libraries at the University of Arizona. For more information about items in this collection, please contact Jennifer Martin, Associate Librarian and Clinical Instructor, Pharmacy Practice and Science, jenmartin@email.arizona.edu.en
html.description.abstractObjectives: To assess older adults’ knowledge of prescription pain and over-the-counter (OTC) medications, to determine if age influences older adults’ choice of OTC pain agents, and to determine if education by a pharmacist about prescription and OTC pain medications impacts the score on a medication knowledge indicator. Methods: This is a descriptive survey study. Participants received a recruitment email with a consent link in order to participate in the secure, online Qualtrics survey. The survey consists of 10 knowledge-based items on pain medications and 12 demographic items. The primary outcome of this study is the knowledge about pain medications of adult 75 years and older. Knowledge scores were analyzed using a Chi square test to compare the proportion of respondents in each age group who score 50% or more. The secondary outcome is the purchase pattern of OTC pain medications based on age. OTC purchasing data was analyzed using a nonparametric regression test. The tertiary outcome is the effect of pharmacist counseling on patients knowledge of prescription and OTC medications. The knowledge indicator scores were compared in patients who reported as either being educated by a pharmacist or not using a one-way ANOVA test. Results: The questionnaire was completed by a total of 50 people, but three were excluded due to not meeting the age requirement of 50 years and older. Forty-seven participants were used in the analysis with mean age of 68.3 years (range 55 to 90) and 72% female. Of 44 participants who completed the entire survey those 75 years and older scored better on the knowledge indicator (71% scored ≥50%) compared with those 74 years and younger (54% scored ≥50%); however, no significant difference was found (p = 0.28). In addition, purchasing pattern based on percentage of both prescription and OTC medications between both groups appeared to be insignificantly different (p = 0.31 and 0.51 respectively). The mean number of OTC medications purchased equaled the mean number of OTC medications purchased for adults less than 75 years of age (Y = 1.2 vs. 1.2 medications per patient, p=0.51). Finally, all patients age 75 and older that reported being educated by a pharmacist scored 50% or greater on the knowledge indicator (100%) while 52% of participants 74 years and younger scored 50% or greater (p = 0.673). Conclusions: Adults ages 75 years and older possess the same basic knowledge of pain medications when compared to adults age 50 to 74. In addition, adults age 75 years and older purchase over-the-counter (OTC) at the same rate as adults age 50 to 74. Finally, adults age 75 years and older benefit most from pharmacist consultation compared to adults age 50 to 74.


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