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dc.contributor.authorKellerhals, Sarah*
dc.date.accessioned2017-06-19T17:00:28Z
dc.date.available2017-06-19T17:00:28Z
dc.date.issued2017-06-19
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/624202
dc.descriptionA Thesis submitted to The University of Arizona College of Medicine - Phoenix in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the Degree of Doctor of Medicine.en
dc.description.abstractSevere acute malnutrition (SAM) affects 13 million children under the age of 5 worldwide, and contributes to 1‐2 million preventable deaths each year. Malnutrition is a significant factor in approximately one third of the nearly 8 million deaths in children who are under 5 years of age worldwide. There have been many revolutions in treatment of SAM over time; however, the exact etiology of this preventable condition is not well understood. This review serves to identify the most common risk factors for the development of SAM in children and to identify the most effective treatment for the disease. There are many factors that contribute to developing and surviving SAM as a child, and this systematic review serves to highlight the most common variables that lead to this cause of mortality. An exhaustive review of PubMed was conducted to complete this review. The literature review demonstrates that the most common risk factor for the development of SAM is low maternal literacy.
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the College of Medicine - Phoenix, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.subjectSystematic Reviewen
dc.subject.meshSevere Acute Malnutritionen
dc.subject.meshMalnutritionen
dc.subject.meshChild Nutrition Disordersen
dc.subject.meshReview Literature as Topicen
dc.subject.meshChild Mortalityen
dc.subject.meshRisk Factorsen
dc.subject.meshEducational Statusen
dc.subject.meshHealth Literacyen
dc.subject.meshPovertyen
dc.subject.meshComorbidityen
dc.subject.meshWasting Syndromeen
dc.subject.meshCachexiaen
dc.subject.meshInfant Nutrition Disordersen
dc.subject.meshProtein-Energy Malnutritionen
dc.subject.meshKwashiorkoren
dc.subject.meshCoinfectionen
dc.subject.meshNutritional and Metabolic Diseasesen
dc.subject.meshGlobal Healthen
dc.titleUnderstanding Severe Acute Malnutrition in Children Globally: A Systematic Reviewen_US
dc.typetext; Electronic Thesisen
dc.contributor.departmentThe University of Arizona College of Medicine - Phoenixen
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item is part of the College of Medicine - Phoenix Scholarly Projects 2017 collection. For more information, contact the Phoenix Biomedical Campus Library at pbc-library@email.arizona.edu.en_US
dc.contributor.mentorCaputo, Graceen
refterms.dateFOA2018-08-14T06:29:59Z
html.description.abstractSevere acute malnutrition (SAM) affects 13 million children under the age of 5 worldwide, and contributes to 1‐2 million preventable deaths each year. Malnutrition is a significant factor in approximately one third of the nearly 8 million deaths in children who are under 5 years of age worldwide. There have been many revolutions in treatment of SAM over time; however, the exact etiology of this preventable condition is not well understood. This review serves to identify the most common risk factors for the development of SAM in children and to identify the most effective treatment for the disease. There are many factors that contribute to developing and surviving SAM as a child, and this systematic review serves to highlight the most common variables that lead to this cause of mortality. An exhaustive review of PubMed was conducted to complete this review. The literature review demonstrates that the most common risk factor for the development of SAM is low maternal literacy.


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