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dc.contributor.advisorArmstrong, Edwarden
dc.contributor.advisorLeal, Sandraen
dc.contributor.authorStrickland, Claire
dc.date.accessioned2017-06-20T17:07:09Z
dc.date.available2017-06-20T17:07:09Z
dc.date.issued2008
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/624271
dc.descriptionClass of 2008 Abstracten
dc.description.abstractObjectives: Inhaled insulin is indicated for the treatment of type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus. This project was designed to evaluate the level of pharmacist knowledge concerning inhaled insulin therapy. Methods: An invitation to complete a questionnaire concerning inhaled insulin was sent via email to pharmacists registered in Arizona and preceptors for the University of Arizona College of Pharmacy. Respondents completed a 36 item questionnaire, including 25 knowledge questions. To determine overall pharmacist knowledge of inhaled insulin, the questionnaire results were aggregated into a total correct score. Independent t-tests were used to compare mean scores based on status as a preceptor, completion of a residency, attendance of an inhaled insulin training session, and pharmacist-reported level of confidence in counseling on inhaled insulin use. Results: The mean total correct score for 60 pharmacists who completed the questionnaire was 13.6 (SD = 6.7) out of 25. The mean scores for preceptor pharmacists and non-preceptor pharmacists were not statistically different. Only pharmacist-reported level of confidence in counseling patients on the use of inhaled insulin was significantly related to total score. Pharmacists who reported they were either “very confident” or “confident” in counseling patients about inhaled insulin achieved a higher total correct score compared to pharmacists reporting lower levels of confidence ( p = 0.009). Conclusions: This study identified an overall lack of knowledge regarding therapy with inhaled insulin among participating pharmacists. Pharmacists who self-reported that they were confident in providing counseling regarding inhaled insulin were significantly more knowledgeable.
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author.en
dc.subjectDiabetesen
dc.subjectInhaled Insulinen
dc.subjectPharmacist Knowlegeen
dc.subject.meshDiabetes Mellitusen
dc.subject.meshInsulinen
dc.subject.meshKnowledgeen
dc.titlePharmacist Knowledge of Inhaled Insulinen_US
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Reporten
dc.contributor.departmentCollege of Pharmacy, The University of Arizonaen
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item is part of the Pharmacy Student Research Projects collection, made available by the College of Pharmacy and the University Libraries at the University of Arizona. For more information about items in this collection, please contact Jennifer Martin, Associate Librarian and Clinical Instructor, Pharmacy Practice and Science, jenmartin@email.arizona.edu.en
html.description.abstractObjectives: Inhaled insulin is indicated for the treatment of type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus. This project was designed to evaluate the level of pharmacist knowledge concerning inhaled insulin therapy. Methods: An invitation to complete a questionnaire concerning inhaled insulin was sent via email to pharmacists registered in Arizona and preceptors for the University of Arizona College of Pharmacy. Respondents completed a 36 item questionnaire, including 25 knowledge questions. To determine overall pharmacist knowledge of inhaled insulin, the questionnaire results were aggregated into a total correct score. Independent t-tests were used to compare mean scores based on status as a preceptor, completion of a residency, attendance of an inhaled insulin training session, and pharmacist-reported level of confidence in counseling on inhaled insulin use. Results: The mean total correct score for 60 pharmacists who completed the questionnaire was 13.6 (SD = 6.7) out of 25. The mean scores for preceptor pharmacists and non-preceptor pharmacists were not statistically different. Only pharmacist-reported level of confidence in counseling patients on the use of inhaled insulin was significantly related to total score. Pharmacists who reported they were either “very confident” or “confident” in counseling patients about inhaled insulin achieved a higher total correct score compared to pharmacists reporting lower levels of confidence ( p = 0.009). Conclusions: This study identified an overall lack of knowledge regarding therapy with inhaled insulin among participating pharmacists. Pharmacists who self-reported that they were confident in providing counseling regarding inhaled insulin were significantly more knowledgeable.


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