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dc.contributor.advisorMurphy, Johnen
dc.contributor.advisorHutchison, Scoten
dc.contributor.authorSmith, Kimberly M.
dc.contributor.authorSmorra, Amy
dc.date.accessioned2017-06-21T16:23:18Z
dc.date.available2017-06-21T16:23:18Z
dc.date.issued2008
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/624301
dc.descriptionClass of 2008 Abstracten
dc.description.abstractObjectives: To assess the effect of metformin usage and lifestyle modifications in women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) in achieving conception and live birth. Methods: A retrospective chart review of patients at a southwest reproductive health center was performed. Patients given a diagnosis of PCOS, treated with metformin alone, with at least 12 weeks of outcome data were enrolled. Diagnostic, reproductive history, and baseline endocrine and metabolic data were collected. All available metformin use, menstrual cyclycity, ovulation, pregnancy, pregnancy outcome, and alternative treatment data were captured. Results: A total of 1250 charts were reviewed and 103 patients were enrolled. Pre-treatment, a significant relationship between BMI and HDL, triglycerides/HDL, and fasting glucose (P <0.001, 0.018, 0.016) was noted with leaner patients having better metabolic profiles. The pregnancy, miscarriage, and live birth rates with metformin treatment were 55.3 %, 18.2 %, and 35.0 % respectively. Patients (40/103) that did not conceive with metformin attempted alternative fertility treatment; 55% became pregnant and 30% had a live birth. One third of all patients experienced minor adverse events, primarily gastrointestinal in nature. Logistic regression analyses comparing responders to nonresponders did not identify any baseline patient characteristics useful as significant predictors of success with metformin treatment. Conclusions: For the population under study, metformin use and lifestyle modifications resulted in conception and live birth for as many as 35 % of patients. Contrary to recent publications, it appears that this method of fertility treatment remains a viable option to treat infertility in patients with polycystic ovary syndrome.
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author.en
dc.subjectPolycystic Ovary Syndromeen
dc.subjectMetforminen
dc.subjectConceptionen
dc.subjectBirthen
dc.subject.meshPolycystic Ovary Syndromeen
dc.subject.meshMetforminen
dc.subject.meshFertilityen
dc.titleRetrospective Analysis of the Effect Metformin Use and Lifestyle Modifications Have on Conception and Live Birth in Polycystic Ovary Syndromeen_US
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Reporten
dc.contributor.departmentCollege of Pharmacy, The University of Arizonaen
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item is part of the Pharmacy Student Research Projects collection, made available by the College of Pharmacy and the University Libraries at the University of Arizona. For more information about items in this collection, please contact Jennifer Martin, Associate Librarian and Clinical Instructor, Pharmacy Practice and Science, jenmartin@email.arizona.edu.en
html.description.abstractObjectives: To assess the effect of metformin usage and lifestyle modifications in women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) in achieving conception and live birth. Methods: A retrospective chart review of patients at a southwest reproductive health center was performed. Patients given a diagnosis of PCOS, treated with metformin alone, with at least 12 weeks of outcome data were enrolled. Diagnostic, reproductive history, and baseline endocrine and metabolic data were collected. All available metformin use, menstrual cyclycity, ovulation, pregnancy, pregnancy outcome, and alternative treatment data were captured. Results: A total of 1250 charts were reviewed and 103 patients were enrolled. Pre-treatment, a significant relationship between BMI and HDL, triglycerides/HDL, and fasting glucose (P <0.001, 0.018, 0.016) was noted with leaner patients having better metabolic profiles. The pregnancy, miscarriage, and live birth rates with metformin treatment were 55.3 %, 18.2 %, and 35.0 % respectively. Patients (40/103) that did not conceive with metformin attempted alternative fertility treatment; 55% became pregnant and 30% had a live birth. One third of all patients experienced minor adverse events, primarily gastrointestinal in nature. Logistic regression analyses comparing responders to nonresponders did not identify any baseline patient characteristics useful as significant predictors of success with metformin treatment. Conclusions: For the population under study, metformin use and lifestyle modifications resulted in conception and live birth for as many as 35 % of patients. Contrary to recent publications, it appears that this method of fertility treatment remains a viable option to treat infertility in patients with polycystic ovary syndrome.


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