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dc.contributor.advisorDraugalis, JoLaineen
dc.contributor.authorBratrud, Lara
dc.contributor.authorFrick, Jacob
dc.date.accessioned2017-06-22T16:26:32Z
dc.date.available2017-06-22T16:26:32Z
dc.date.issued2007
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/624322
dc.descriptionClass of 2007 Abstracten
dc.description.abstractObjectives: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the required didactic curriculum of the graduating class of 2007 of the University of Arizona College of Pharmacy by assessing the extent that it satisfied the Outcomes Expected document. The curriculum was evaluated specifically for the disease states of diabetes and hypertension, as well as general pharmacy areas. This also offered insight into which areas of the document needed to be addressed more completely in the pharmacy curriculum. Methods: This was a retrospective analysis using the graduating class of 2007 as a cohort for evaluating the competencies. Course materials from required courses were reviewed to identify components that were met. Results: When all components were analyzed, the curriculum addressed 85.2% of the outcomes expected. All but 1 component of Domain 1.0 was covered, 95.8% (23/24), and Domain 2.0 was completely covered (23/23). While Domain 3.0 was not addressed in the required curriculum, students may have experienced these competencies through extracurricular activities. Coverage of both disease specific topics, diabetes and hypertension, was evidenced identically with course material. All components specific to the disease state were covered 85.7% (18/21). Domain 1.0 was addressed 88.9% (16/18), Domain 2.0 was addressed 66.7% (2/3), and Domain 3.0 was not addressed in the documentation. Conclusions: The documented curriculum of the graduating class of 2007 at the University of Arizona College of Pharmacy did not fulfill all components in the Outcomes Expected document. While some areas may have been addressed, documentation was lacking. We encourage course directors to reevaluate their curriculum to ensure areas not evidenced with coverage are addressed. We also urge more stringent documentation of the areas that were not evidenced with documentation.
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author.en
dc.subjectPharmacy Curriculumen
dc.subjectOutcomes Expected Documenten
dc.subject.meshCurriculumen
dc.subject.meshEducation, Pharmacyen
dc.titleAssessing Pharmacy Curriculum: A Disease-Specific Demonstration of an Outcomes Expected Documenten_US
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Reporten
dc.contributor.departmentCollege of Pharmacy, The University of Arizonaen
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item is part of the Pharmacy Student Research Projects collection, made available by the College of Pharmacy and the University Libraries at the University of Arizona. For more information about items in this collection, please contact Jennifer Martin, Associate Librarian and Clinical Instructor, Pharmacy Practice and Science, jenmartin@email.arizona.edu.en
html.description.abstractObjectives: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the required didactic curriculum of the graduating class of 2007 of the University of Arizona College of Pharmacy by assessing the extent that it satisfied the Outcomes Expected document. The curriculum was evaluated specifically for the disease states of diabetes and hypertension, as well as general pharmacy areas. This also offered insight into which areas of the document needed to be addressed more completely in the pharmacy curriculum. Methods: This was a retrospective analysis using the graduating class of 2007 as a cohort for evaluating the competencies. Course materials from required courses were reviewed to identify components that were met. Results: When all components were analyzed, the curriculum addressed 85.2% of the outcomes expected. All but 1 component of Domain 1.0 was covered, 95.8% (23/24), and Domain 2.0 was completely covered (23/23). While Domain 3.0 was not addressed in the required curriculum, students may have experienced these competencies through extracurricular activities. Coverage of both disease specific topics, diabetes and hypertension, was evidenced identically with course material. All components specific to the disease state were covered 85.7% (18/21). Domain 1.0 was addressed 88.9% (16/18), Domain 2.0 was addressed 66.7% (2/3), and Domain 3.0 was not addressed in the documentation. Conclusions: The documented curriculum of the graduating class of 2007 at the University of Arizona College of Pharmacy did not fulfill all components in the Outcomes Expected document. While some areas may have been addressed, documentation was lacking. We encourage course directors to reevaluate their curriculum to ensure areas not evidenced with coverage are addressed. We also urge more stringent documentation of the areas that were not evidenced with documentation.


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