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dc.contributor.advisorFankhauser, Marthaen
dc.contributor.authorConfer, Jennifer
dc.contributor.authorLaird, Deborah
dc.date.accessioned2017-06-22T17:18:14Z
dc.date.available2017-06-22T17:18:14Z
dc.date.issued2007
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/624327
dc.descriptionClass of 2007 Abstracten
dc.description.abstractObjectives: A prescription claims database from COPE Behavioral Services in Tucson, Arizona was used to retrospectively assess the differences between patients receiving <4 and those receiving > 4 psychotropic medications over a 12-month period in adult patients with schizophrenia. Methods: Medication groups (i.e., < 4 versus > 4 concomitant psychotropic agents) were compared for differences in gender, age, duplication of antipsychotic therapy, adherence rates, court order treatment status, psychiatric hospitalization rates and length of stay, cost of services provided, and concomitant psychotropic medications. Results: A total of 506 adult patients with schizophrenia (F=214 and M=292) met the inclusion criteria for receiving psychotropic medications during the 12-month study. Of those, 388 patients (76.7%) were found to have an average of < 4 medications, while 118 patients (23.3%) were found to have > 4 medications. Duplication of antipsychotic therapy was more common in the > 4 group (29.7%) compared to the < 4 group (3.1%), p < 0.001. Psychotropic adherence rates were significantly higher in the > 4 group based on month’s supply of prescriptions. Demographic differences between groups included: increased age, more women, fewer court order status, and higher cost of care in the > 4 compared to the < 4 medication group. No differences in hospitalizations, length of stay, and hospital costs were found between groups. Conclusions: Our findings suggest that patients with schizophrenia with increased rates of polypharmacy have higher adherence rates, more duplication of antipsychotics, and a higher cost of care (i.e., case management, laboratory, other services, total prescription costs) compared to patients receiving < 4 psychotropic medications.
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author.en
dc.subjectPsychotropic Drugsen
dc.subjectPolypharmacyen
dc.subjectSchizophreniaen
dc.subjectMedication Adherenceen
dc.subject.meshSchizophreniaen
dc.subject.meshPsychotropic Drugsen
dc.subject.meshPolypharmacyen
dc.subject.meshMedication Adherenceen
dc.titlePsychotropic Polypharmacy in Outpatients with Schizophrenia: Comparison of Oral Psychotropic Adherence Rates, Duplication of Therapy, Psychiatric Hospitalizations, Cost of Services, and Concomitant Medicationsen_US
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Reporten
dc.contributor.departmentCollege of Pharmacy, The University of Arizonaen
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item is part of the Pharmacy Student Research Projects collection, made available by the College of Pharmacy and the University Libraries at the University of Arizona. For more information about items in this collection, please contact Jennifer Martin, Associate Librarian and Clinical Instructor, Pharmacy Practice and Science, jenmartin@email.arizona.edu.en
html.description.abstractObjectives: A prescription claims database from COPE Behavioral Services in Tucson, Arizona was used to retrospectively assess the differences between patients receiving <4 and those receiving > 4 psychotropic medications over a 12-month period in adult patients with schizophrenia. Methods: Medication groups (i.e., < 4 versus > 4 concomitant psychotropic agents) were compared for differences in gender, age, duplication of antipsychotic therapy, adherence rates, court order treatment status, psychiatric hospitalization rates and length of stay, cost of services provided, and concomitant psychotropic medications. Results: A total of 506 adult patients with schizophrenia (F=214 and M=292) met the inclusion criteria for receiving psychotropic medications during the 12-month study. Of those, 388 patients (76.7%) were found to have an average of < 4 medications, while 118 patients (23.3%) were found to have > 4 medications. Duplication of antipsychotic therapy was more common in the > 4 group (29.7%) compared to the < 4 group (3.1%), p < 0.001. Psychotropic adherence rates were significantly higher in the > 4 group based on month’s supply of prescriptions. Demographic differences between groups included: increased age, more women, fewer court order status, and higher cost of care in the > 4 compared to the < 4 medication group. No differences in hospitalizations, length of stay, and hospital costs were found between groups. Conclusions: Our findings suggest that patients with schizophrenia with increased rates of polypharmacy have higher adherence rates, more duplication of antipsychotics, and a higher cost of care (i.e., case management, laboratory, other services, total prescription costs) compared to patients receiving < 4 psychotropic medications.


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