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dc.contributor.advisorSkrepnek, Granten
dc.contributor.authorFichtner, Amber
dc.contributor.authorSandvig, Ellen
dc.contributor.authorTauson, Katherine
dc.date.accessioned2017-06-22T17:26:30Z
dc.date.available2017-06-22T17:26:30Z
dc.date.issued2007
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/624328
dc.descriptionClass of 2007 Abstracten
dc.description.abstractObjectives: To explore the economic burden of illness and outcomes associated with in-patient related cases of asthma. Methods: This retrospective database study used Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project’s National Inpatient Survey to investigate the total number of discharges, length of stay and health care costs of patients with a primary diagnosis of asthma based on gender, payer and level of income. Data was analyzed using a non-parametric z-test to determine if results were significant. Results: A total of 418,789 patients (164,045 male, 251,264 female, 3,479 missing) were admitted with the category diagnosis of asthma in 2004. Females had a longer mean length of stay, higher mean charges and higher aggregate charges than males. These apparent differences were found to be significant. Medicaid had a larger number of total discharged and higher aggregate charges. Both these outcomes were found to be significant when compared to all other payers, expect there was no significance between Medicaid and Medicare in regards to aggregate charges. Medicare had a longer mean length of stay and higher mean charges which were found to be significant when compared to all other payers. Not low median income had more discharges, longer mean length of stay and higher mean and aggregate charges compared to low median income. These apparent differences were found to be significant. Conclusions: Being of female gender, or part of a government funded program (Medicaid or Medicare) or having an income of $36,000+ would result in higher discharge rates, longer mean length of stay and higher mean and aggregate charges in respect to asthma hospitalizations.
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author.en
dc.subjectBurden of Illnessen
dc.subjectAsthmaen
dc.subjectInpatienten
dc.subject.meshAsthmaen
dc.subject.meshInpatientsen
dc.subject.meshCost of Illnessen
dc.titleEconomic Burden of Illness and Outcomes Associated with Inpatient-Related Cases of Asthmaen_US
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Reporten
dc.contributor.departmentCollege of Pharmacy, The University of Arizonaen
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item is part of the Pharmacy Student Research Projects collection, made available by the College of Pharmacy and the University Libraries at the University of Arizona. For more information about items in this collection, please contact Jennifer Martin, Associate Librarian and Clinical Instructor, Pharmacy Practice and Science, jenmartin@email.arizona.edu.en
html.description.abstractObjectives: To explore the economic burden of illness and outcomes associated with in-patient related cases of asthma. Methods: This retrospective database study used Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project’s National Inpatient Survey to investigate the total number of discharges, length of stay and health care costs of patients with a primary diagnosis of asthma based on gender, payer and level of income. Data was analyzed using a non-parametric z-test to determine if results were significant. Results: A total of 418,789 patients (164,045 male, 251,264 female, 3,479 missing) were admitted with the category diagnosis of asthma in 2004. Females had a longer mean length of stay, higher mean charges and higher aggregate charges than males. These apparent differences were found to be significant. Medicaid had a larger number of total discharged and higher aggregate charges. Both these outcomes were found to be significant when compared to all other payers, expect there was no significance between Medicaid and Medicare in regards to aggregate charges. Medicare had a longer mean length of stay and higher mean charges which were found to be significant when compared to all other payers. Not low median income had more discharges, longer mean length of stay and higher mean and aggregate charges compared to low median income. These apparent differences were found to be significant. Conclusions: Being of female gender, or part of a government funded program (Medicaid or Medicare) or having an income of $36,000+ would result in higher discharge rates, longer mean length of stay and higher mean and aggregate charges in respect to asthma hospitalizations.


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