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dc.contributor.authorMinor, Jesse
dc.contributor.authorFalk, Donald
dc.contributor.authorBarron-Gafford, Greg
dc.date.accessioned2017-06-23T17:27:41Z
dc.date.available2017-06-23T17:27:41Z
dc.date.issued2017-06-22
dc.identifier.citationFire Severity and Regeneration Strategy Influence Shrub Patch Size and Structure Following Disturbance 2017, 8 (7):221 Forestsen
dc.identifier.issn1999-4907
dc.identifier.doi10.3390/f8070221
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/624330
dc.description.abstractClimate change is increasing the frequency and extent of high-severity disturbance, with potential to alter vegetation community composition and structure in environments sensitive to tipping points between alternative states. Shrub species display a range of characteristics that promote resistance and resilience to disturbance, and which yield differential post-disturbance outcomes. We investigated differences in shrub patch size and stem density in response to variations in fire severity, vegetation community, and post-disturbance reproductive strategies in Sky Island forested ecosystems in the southwestern United States. Patterns in shrub structure reflect the effects of fire severity as well as differences among species with alternate post-fire reproductive strategies. Increased fire severity correlates with larger patch sizes and greater stem densities; these patterns are observed across multiple fire events, indicating that disturbance legacies can persist for decades. High severity fire produces the largest shrub patches, and variance in shrub patch size increases with severity. High severity fire is likely to promote expansion of shrub species on the landscape, with implications for future community structure. Resprouting species have the greatest variability in patch structure, while seeding species show a strong response to disturbance: resprouting species dominateatlowdisturbanceseverities,andobligateseedersdominatehighseverityareas. Differential post-fire reproductive strategies are likely to generate distinct patterns of vegetation distribution following disturbance, with implications for community composition at various scales. Shrub species demonstrate flexible responses to wildfire disturbance severity that are reflected in shrub patch dynamics at small and intermediate scales.
dc.description.sponsorshipResearch funding was provided by the Coronado National Forest, through the Arizona FireScape program (www.azfirescape.org).en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherMDPIen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.mdpi.com/1999-4907/8/7/221en
dc.rights© 2017 by the authors. Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland. This article is an open access article distributed under the terms and conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY) license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/).en
dc.subjectecological disturbanceen
dc.subjectMadrean archipelagoen
dc.subjectNorth American Monsoonen
dc.subjectplant structureen
dc.subjectplasticityen
dc.subjectreproductive strategyen
dc.subjectshrubfielden
dc.subjectsproutingen
dc.subjecttipping pointsen
dc.subjectwildfireen
dc.titleFire Severity and Regeneration Strategy Influence Shrub Patch Size and Structure Following Disturbanceen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentSchool of Geography and Development, University of Arizonaen
dc.contributor.departmentSchool of Natural Resources and the Environment, University of Arizonaen
dc.identifier.journalForestsen
dc.description.noteOpen Access Journalen
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en
dc.eprint.versionFinal published versionen
refterms.dateFOA2018-08-13T22:00:12Z
html.description.abstractClimate change is increasing the frequency and extent of high-severity disturbance, with potential to alter vegetation community composition and structure in environments sensitive to tipping points between alternative states. Shrub species display a range of characteristics that promote resistance and resilience to disturbance, and which yield differential post-disturbance outcomes. We investigated differences in shrub patch size and stem density in response to variations in fire severity, vegetation community, and post-disturbance reproductive strategies in Sky Island forested ecosystems in the southwestern United States. Patterns in shrub structure reflect the effects of fire severity as well as differences among species with alternate post-fire reproductive strategies. Increased fire severity correlates with larger patch sizes and greater stem densities; these patterns are observed across multiple fire events, indicating that disturbance legacies can persist for decades. High severity fire produces the largest shrub patches, and variance in shrub patch size increases with severity. High severity fire is likely to promote expansion of shrub species on the landscape, with implications for future community structure. Resprouting species have the greatest variability in patch structure, while seeding species show a strong response to disturbance: resprouting species dominateatlowdisturbanceseverities,andobligateseedersdominatehighseverityareas. Differential post-fire reproductive strategies are likely to generate distinct patterns of vegetation distribution following disturbance, with implications for community composition at various scales. Shrub species demonstrate flexible responses to wildfire disturbance severity that are reflected in shrub patch dynamics at small and intermediate scales.


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