Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorSwetnam, Tyson L.
dc.contributor.authorBrooks, Paul D.
dc.contributor.authorBarnard, Holly R.
dc.contributor.authorHarpold, Adrian A.
dc.contributor.authorGallo, Erika L.
dc.date.accessioned2017-06-23T22:52:47Z
dc.date.available2017-06-23T22:52:47Z
dc.date.issued2017-04
dc.identifier.citationTopographically driven differences in energy and water constrain climatic control on forest carbon sequestration 2017, 8 (4):e01797 Ecosphereen
dc.identifier.issn21508925
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/ecs2.1797
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/624369
dc.description.abstractMountains are vital to ecosystems and human society given their influence on global carbon and water cycles. Yet the extent to which topography regulates montane forest carbon uptake and storage remains poorly understood. To address this knowledge gap, we compared forest aboveground carbon loading to topographic metrics describing energy balance and water availability across three headwater catchments of the Boulder Creek Watershed, Colorado, USA. The catchments range from 1800 to 3500 m above mean sea level with 46-102 cm/yr mean annual precipitation and -1.2 degrees to 12.3 degrees C mean annual temperature. In all three catchments, we found mean forest carbon loading consistently increased from ridges (27 +/- 19 Mg C ha) to valley bottoms (60 +/- 28 Mg C ha). Low topographic positions held up to 185 +/- 76 Mg C ha, more than twice the peak value of upper positions. Toe slopes fostered disproportionately high net carbon uptake relative to other topographic positions. Carbon storage was on average 20-40 Mg C ha greater on north to northeast aspects than on south to southwest aspects, a pattern most pronounced in the highest elevation, coldest and wettest catchment. Both the peak and mean aboveground carbon storage of the three catchments, crossing an 11 degrees C range in temperature and doubling of local precipitation, defied the expectation of an optimal elevation-gradient climatic zone for net primary production. These results have important implications for models of forest sensitivity to climate change, as well as to predicted estimates of continental carbon reservoirs.
dc.description.sponsorshipNational Science Foundation [NSF-0724960, DBI-0735191, DBI-1265383]; NSF's Division of Earth Sciences, Instrumentation and Facilities Program [EAR-1043051]; U.S. Department of Energy's Terrestrial Ecosystem Science Program (DOE ) [DE-SC0006968]; Santa Catalina-Jemez River Basin CZO [NSF-1331408]en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherWILEYen
dc.relation.urlhttp://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/ecs2.1797en
dc.rights© 2017 Swetnam et al. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons AttributionLicense, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.en
dc.subjectcarbonen
dc.subjectclimate changeen
dc.subjecteco-hydrologyen
dc.subjectforestsen
dc.subjectlidaren
dc.subjectmicroclimateen
dc.subjecttopographyen
dc.titleTopographically driven differences in energy and water constrain climatic control on forest carbon sequestrationen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Arizona, Inst BIO5en
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Arizona, Dept Hydrol & Water Resourcesen
dc.identifier.journalEcosphereen
dc.description.noteopen access journalen
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en
dc.eprint.versionFinal published versionen
dc.contributor.institutionBIO5 Institute; University of Arizona; 1657 E Helen Street Tucson Arizona 85721 USA
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Geology and Geophysics; University of Utah; Frederick Albert Sutton Building, 115 S 1460 E 383 Salt Lake City Utah 84112 USA
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Geography and INSTAAR; University of Colorado; Guggenheim 110, 260 UCB Boulder Colorado 80309 USA
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Natural Resources and Environmental Science; University of Nevada, Reno; 1664 N. Virginia Street Reno Nevada 89557 USA
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Hydrology and Water Resources; University of Arizona; JW Harshbarger Building 11 Tucson Arizona 85721 USA
refterms.dateFOA2018-09-11T20:25:10Z
html.description.abstractMountains are vital to ecosystems and human society given their influence on global carbon and water cycles. Yet the extent to which topography regulates montane forest carbon uptake and storage remains poorly understood. To address this knowledge gap, we compared forest aboveground carbon loading to topographic metrics describing energy balance and water availability across three headwater catchments of the Boulder Creek Watershed, Colorado, USA. The catchments range from 1800 to 3500 m above mean sea level with 46-102 cm/yr mean annual precipitation and -1.2 degrees to 12.3 degrees C mean annual temperature. In all three catchments, we found mean forest carbon loading consistently increased from ridges (27 +/- 19 Mg C ha) to valley bottoms (60 +/- 28 Mg C ha). Low topographic positions held up to 185 +/- 76 Mg C ha, more than twice the peak value of upper positions. Toe slopes fostered disproportionately high net carbon uptake relative to other topographic positions. Carbon storage was on average 20-40 Mg C ha greater on north to northeast aspects than on south to southwest aspects, a pattern most pronounced in the highest elevation, coldest and wettest catchment. Both the peak and mean aboveground carbon storage of the three catchments, crossing an 11 degrees C range in temperature and doubling of local precipitation, defied the expectation of an optimal elevation-gradient climatic zone for net primary production. These results have important implications for models of forest sensitivity to climate change, as well as to predicted estimates of continental carbon reservoirs.


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Name:
Swetnam_et_al-2017-Ecosphere.pdf
Size:
3.636Mb
Format:
PDF
Description:
FInal Published Version

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record