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dc.contributor.advisorMalone, Daniel C.en
dc.contributor.authorKurowsky, John D.
dc.date.accessioned2017-06-26T16:39:30Z
dc.date.available2017-06-26T16:39:30Z
dc.date.issued2007
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/624404
dc.descriptionClass of 2007 Abstracten
dc.description.abstractObjectives: The purpose of this study was to determine if there is a difference between both graduating medical and pharmacy students in their capabilities to appropriately recognize drug-drug interactions that have led or can lead to serious toxicological consequences in humans. The hypothesis of this study was that there would be no difference between the ability of medical and pharmacy students to recognize potential drug-drug interactions. Methods: A two-page questionnaire was giving during the last semester before both the medical and pharmacy students graduate. The first page requested information about demographics, such as: gender, age, current educational program, previous education in healthcare, other degrees held, and average hours worked in healthcare per week for the past year. The second page contained 22 questions on potential drug-drug interactions. Also, there will be some questions that do not contain any drug-drug interactions. The students had four choices, in which they could answer. The choices were (1) The two drugs should not be used together (contraindicated), (2) The two drugs may be used safely together with monitoring, (3) The two drugs may be used safely together without monitoring, and (4) Not sure if the drugs can be used together. Results: Of the 168 questionnaires distributed, 51 were completed and returned. Forty-seven pharmacy students responded, while only 4 medical students responded. Pharmacy students correctly identified 38.4% + 11.7% of the interactions. The minimum correct responses was 13.6% and the maximum was 68.2% Pharmacy students without a bachelor of science (BS) performed slightly better than the students having a BS with a mean score of 40.0% + 3.0% and 37.1% + 9.0%, respectively. There was no significant difference between the groups (p = 0.42). Males had a mean score of 39.1% + 8.2%, while females had a mean score of 38.1% + 13.1%. There was no significant difference between the groups (p = 0.78). Also, there was no significant difference between the student’s age or how many hours they worked per week regarding the percent of correct responses.
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author.en
dc.subjectDrug-Drug Interactionsen
dc.subjectPharmacy Studentsen
dc.subjectMedical Studentsen
dc.subject.meshDrug Interactionsen
dc.subject.meshStudents, Medicalen
dc.subject.meshStudents, Pharmacyen
dc.titleA Survey of Pharmacy and Medical School Students’ Ability to Recognize Drug-Drug Interactionsen_US
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Reporten
dc.contributor.departmentCollege of Pharmacy, The University of Arizonaen
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item is part of the Pharmacy Student Research Projects collection, made available by the College of Pharmacy and the University Libraries at the University of Arizona. For more information about items in this collection, please contact Jennifer Martin, Associate Librarian and Clinical Instructor, Pharmacy Practice and Science, jenmartin@email.arizona.edu.en
html.description.abstractObjectives: The purpose of this study was to determine if there is a difference between both graduating medical and pharmacy students in their capabilities to appropriately recognize drug-drug interactions that have led or can lead to serious toxicological consequences in humans. The hypothesis of this study was that there would be no difference between the ability of medical and pharmacy students to recognize potential drug-drug interactions. Methods: A two-page questionnaire was giving during the last semester before both the medical and pharmacy students graduate. The first page requested information about demographics, such as: gender, age, current educational program, previous education in healthcare, other degrees held, and average hours worked in healthcare per week for the past year. The second page contained 22 questions on potential drug-drug interactions. Also, there will be some questions that do not contain any drug-drug interactions. The students had four choices, in which they could answer. The choices were (1) The two drugs should not be used together (contraindicated), (2) The two drugs may be used safely together with monitoring, (3) The two drugs may be used safely together without monitoring, and (4) Not sure if the drugs can be used together. Results: Of the 168 questionnaires distributed, 51 were completed and returned. Forty-seven pharmacy students responded, while only 4 medical students responded. Pharmacy students correctly identified 38.4% + 11.7% of the interactions. The minimum correct responses was 13.6% and the maximum was 68.2% Pharmacy students without a bachelor of science (BS) performed slightly better than the students having a BS with a mean score of 40.0% + 3.0% and 37.1% + 9.0%, respectively. There was no significant difference between the groups (p = 0.42). Males had a mean score of 39.1% + 8.2%, while females had a mean score of 38.1% + 13.1%. There was no significant difference between the groups (p = 0.78). Also, there was no significant difference between the student’s age or how many hours they worked per week regarding the percent of correct responses.


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