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dc.contributor.advisorLansey, Kevin E.en
dc.contributor.authorChee, Ronson Riley
dc.creatorChee, Ronson Rileyen
dc.date.accessioned2017-06-28T19:19:56Z
dc.date.available2017-06-28T19:19:56Z
dc.date.issued2017
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/624473
dc.description.abstractNotorious for its high poverty levels and low socio-economic status, the Navajo Nation’s socio-economic well-being is hindered greatly in part by the lack of an adequate potable water infrastructure which has resulted in health disparities and has attributed to stunted economic growth within the Nation. Large candidate regional water transmission pipelines projects aimed to meet these needs have been identified. With capital costs exceeding their fiscal capability, decision-makers must choose projects that generate the most bang for the buck. To address these challenges, three (3) interconnected planning tools have been developed: (1) a water pipe installation construction cost estimation model (WaterCOSTE) to improve the accuracy of capital cost estimates; (2) a hydraulic optimization model (WaterTRANS) that improves design efficiency for branched water transmission systems; and (3) a decision support system (DSS) that allows candidate water transmission projects to be ranked while considering economic development, health improvement and environmental protection objectives. Estimates derived from WaterCOSTE are used as input into WaterTRANS to find least-cost system designs. The system costs along with other project data are then input into the DSS to determine project rankings. To demonstrate how the DSS can be used and applied, two candidate projects on the Navajo Nation are evaluated. The tools developed will enable decision-makers to improve planning processes and make wiser investment decisions that will lead to expanding the water infrastructure coverage and living conditions on the Navajo Nation.
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.subjectDecision Support Systemen
dc.subjectPipeline Construction Cost Estimationen
dc.subjectWater Distributionen
dc.subjectWater Infrastructure Investmentsen
dc.subjectWater Pipelinesen
dc.subjectWater Transmission Systemsen
dc.titlePrioritization of Potable Water Infrastructure Investments on the Navajo Nationen_US
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen
dc.contributor.committeememberLansey, Kevin E.en
dc.contributor.committeememberValdes, Juan B.en
dc.contributor.committeememberDuan, Jennifer G.en
dc.contributor.committeememberGupta, Hoshin V.en
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen
thesis.degree.disciplineCivil Engineeringen
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en
refterms.dateFOA2018-05-27T23:49:17Z
html.description.abstractNotorious for its high poverty levels and low socio-economic status, the Navajo Nation’s socio-economic well-being is hindered greatly in part by the lack of an adequate potable water infrastructure which has resulted in health disparities and has attributed to stunted economic growth within the Nation. Large candidate regional water transmission pipelines projects aimed to meet these needs have been identified. With capital costs exceeding their fiscal capability, decision-makers must choose projects that generate the most bang for the buck. To address these challenges, three (3) interconnected planning tools have been developed: (1) a water pipe installation construction cost estimation model (WaterCOSTE) to improve the accuracy of capital cost estimates; (2) a hydraulic optimization model (WaterTRANS) that improves design efficiency for branched water transmission systems; and (3) a decision support system (DSS) that allows candidate water transmission projects to be ranked while considering economic development, health improvement and environmental protection objectives. Estimates derived from WaterCOSTE are used as input into WaterTRANS to find least-cost system designs. The system costs along with other project data are then input into the DSS to determine project rankings. To demonstrate how the DSS can be used and applied, two candidate projects on the Navajo Nation are evaluated. The tools developed will enable decision-makers to improve planning processes and make wiser investment decisions that will lead to expanding the water infrastructure coverage and living conditions on the Navajo Nation.


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