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dc.contributor.advisorDuBois, Janeten
dc.contributor.authorCouch, Heather Christine
dc.creatorCouch, Heather Christineen
dc.date.accessioned2017-06-28T22:04:19Z
dc.date.available2017-06-28T22:04:19Z
dc.date.issued2017
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/624500
dc.description.abstractUS asthma prevalence increased by five million in the last decade and health care spending for the disease increased from $53 billion to $56 billion. Children are more likely than adults to have an asthma attack and its estimated that 1-in-10 youth has asthma. Despite initiatives to promote adherence to practice guidelines, childhood asthma emergency room) visits, and hospitalizations remain steady while the number of asthma deaths have increased over a 17-year period. Preliminary studies find the majority of adolescents prefer smartphones as a means of education and guidance. A modified Technology Acceptance Model (TAM) survey was comprised of 15 statements that explored providers' acceptance of smartphone applications (apps) as an adjunct strategy for management of asthma among adolescents in the outpatient setting. Current insight in adolescent asthma demonstrates multifaceted disparities in care stemming from biological and developmental transitions unique to adolescents. The quantitative, descriptive design of the project assessed two factors integral to the TAM related to provider acceptance and perception: 1) Perceived use (PU), and 2) Perceived ease of use (PEU). The survey sample consisted of 18 providers. Overwhelmingly, the majority of providers surveyed favored use of a smartphone app for adolescent asthma and believed apps had the potential to improve the quality of adolescent asthma management. Most participants agreed; smartphone apps might help accomplish benchmarks for adolescent asthma management. Numerous studies demonstrate adolescents’ preference for technological interventions for self-management of their asthma symptoms. The survey results reinforce the willingness of providers to accept asthma smartphone apps as a potential adjunct management strategy for adolescent asthma. Additional studies involving providers are required to further explore provider attitudes of acceptance and rejection relating to smartphone apps for chronic health conditions.
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.subjectadolescenten
dc.subjectasthmaen
dc.subjectmHealthen
dc.subjectmobile applicationsen
dc.subjectprimary careen
dc.subjectsmartphone applicationsen
dc.titleProviders' Acceptance of Smartphone Applications as a Supportive Strategy for Adolescent Asthmaen_US
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen
dc.contributor.committeememberDuBois, Janeten
dc.contributor.committeememberPacheco, Christyen
dc.contributor.committeememberPeek, Gloannaen
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen
thesis.degree.disciplineNursingen
thesis.degree.nameD.N.P.en
refterms.dateFOA2018-07-01T05:16:31Z
html.description.abstractUS asthma prevalence increased by five million in the last decade and health care spending for the disease increased from $53 billion to $56 billion. Children are more likely than adults to have an asthma attack and its estimated that 1-in-10 youth has asthma. Despite initiatives to promote adherence to practice guidelines, childhood asthma emergency room) visits, and hospitalizations remain steady while the number of asthma deaths have increased over a 17-year period. Preliminary studies find the majority of adolescents prefer smartphones as a means of education and guidance. A modified Technology Acceptance Model (TAM) survey was comprised of 15 statements that explored providers' acceptance of smartphone applications (apps) as an adjunct strategy for management of asthma among adolescents in the outpatient setting. Current insight in adolescent asthma demonstrates multifaceted disparities in care stemming from biological and developmental transitions unique to adolescents. The quantitative, descriptive design of the project assessed two factors integral to the TAM related to provider acceptance and perception: 1) Perceived use (PU), and 2) Perceived ease of use (PEU). The survey sample consisted of 18 providers. Overwhelmingly, the majority of providers surveyed favored use of a smartphone app for adolescent asthma and believed apps had the potential to improve the quality of adolescent asthma management. Most participants agreed; smartphone apps might help accomplish benchmarks for adolescent asthma management. Numerous studies demonstrate adolescents’ preference for technological interventions for self-management of their asthma symptoms. The survey results reinforce the willingness of providers to accept asthma smartphone apps as a potential adjunct management strategy for adolescent asthma. Additional studies involving providers are required to further explore provider attitudes of acceptance and rejection relating to smartphone apps for chronic health conditions.


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