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dc.contributor.advisorCarlisle, Heather L.en
dc.contributor.authorGaines, Jenna H.
dc.creatorGaines, Jenna H.en
dc.date.accessioned2017-06-28T22:15:19Z
dc.date.available2017-06-28T22:15:19Z
dc.date.issued2017
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/624502
dc.description.abstractThe spectrum of acute pancreatitis (AP) affects between 4.9 and 73.4 patients out of 100,000 worldwide annually (Tenner, Baillie, DeWitt, & Vege, 2013). AP uses the Atlanta classification system to establish a diagnosis of mild, moderate, or severe. The American College of Gastroenterology (ACG) has established comprehensive clinical practice guidelines (CPG) for the management of AP, the most recent version published in 2013 (Tenner et al., 2013). There have been similar CPGs published internationally that integrate current evidence-based research into recommendations for practice. These guidelines along with the ACG's guidelines recommend initiating a diet for mild acute pancreatitis patients due to research findings of improved patient outcomes (i.e. reduced length of hospital stay, decreased rate of infections, and reduced mortality) (Horibe et al., 2015; Lariño-Noia et al., 2014). There is an international awareness of the need for increased CPG nutrition recommendation compliance in the practice setting as many studies have found providers prefer to keep patients nil per os (NPO) and do not adhere to CPGs (Andersson, Andrén-Sandberg, Nilsson, & Andersson, 2012; Greenberg et al., 2016; Sun et al., 2013). The purpose of this doctor of nursing practice (DNP) project is to assess providers' current nutrition therapy practice and knowledge of the ACG’s CPG nutrition recommendations for mild AP patients. The researcher conducted the assessment with a hospitalist practice at Banner University Medical Center in Phoenix, Arizona. The results of the project contribute to the current body of research on national adherence to CPGs for AP and act as a needs assessment for future projects where a nutrition protocol order set may be established. The investigation of nutrition therapy for AP patients seeks to improve and standardize the care this patient population receives while in the acute care setting.
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.subjectAcute pancreatitisen
dc.subjectbarriersen
dc.subjectclinical practice guidelinesen
dc.subjectprovider knowledgeen
dc.subjectprovider practiceen
dc.titleBarriers to Implementing Clinical Practice Guideline Nutrition Recommendations in Mild Acute Pancreatitis Patients: Provider's Knowledge and Practiceen_US
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen
dc.contributor.committeememberCarlisle, Heather L.en
dc.contributor.committeememberBuchner, Brian R.en
dc.contributor.committeememberFlamm, Kristie L.en
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen
thesis.degree.disciplineNursingen
thesis.degree.nameD.N.P.en
refterms.dateFOA2018-09-11T20:42:05Z
html.description.abstractThe spectrum of acute pancreatitis (AP) affects between 4.9 and 73.4 patients out of 100,000 worldwide annually (Tenner, Baillie, DeWitt, & Vege, 2013). AP uses the Atlanta classification system to establish a diagnosis of mild, moderate, or severe. The American College of Gastroenterology (ACG) has established comprehensive clinical practice guidelines (CPG) for the management of AP, the most recent version published in 2013 (Tenner et al., 2013). There have been similar CPGs published internationally that integrate current evidence-based research into recommendations for practice. These guidelines along with the ACG's guidelines recommend initiating a diet for mild acute pancreatitis patients due to research findings of improved patient outcomes (i.e. reduced length of hospital stay, decreased rate of infections, and reduced mortality) (Horibe et al., 2015; Lariño-Noia et al., 2014). There is an international awareness of the need for increased CPG nutrition recommendation compliance in the practice setting as many studies have found providers prefer to keep patients nil per os (NPO) and do not adhere to CPGs (Andersson, Andrén-Sandberg, Nilsson, & Andersson, 2012; Greenberg et al., 2016; Sun et al., 2013). The purpose of this doctor of nursing practice (DNP) project is to assess providers' current nutrition therapy practice and knowledge of the ACG’s CPG nutrition recommendations for mild AP patients. The researcher conducted the assessment with a hospitalist practice at Banner University Medical Center in Phoenix, Arizona. The results of the project contribute to the current body of research on national adherence to CPGs for AP and act as a needs assessment for future projects where a nutrition protocol order set may be established. The investigation of nutrition therapy for AP patients seeks to improve and standardize the care this patient population receives while in the acute care setting.


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