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dc.contributor.advisorDavis, Maryen
dc.contributor.authorEckes, Kelly
dc.creatorEckes, Kellyen
dc.date.accessioned2017-06-29T16:46:57Z
dc.date.available2017-06-29T16:46:57Z
dc.date.issued2017
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/624512
dc.description.abstractBackground: Chronic disease is a growing problem in the United States and in Wyoming. It is associated with increased costs and increased morbidity and mortality. Technologies such as patient health portals have been shown to improve patient outcomes. Objective: The objective is to promote future use of the patient portal as a tool to improve chronic disease management by identifying opportunities to increase their use. Design: Using quantitative methodology, a 38-item survey was created to examine primary care providers' preexisting knowledge, attitudes, practice facilitators and barriers about patient portal use and chronic disease management. Setting: A nurse owned primary care clinic in central Wyoming Participants: Four nurse practitioners. Measurements: The survey responses and Likert-type questions, analyzed the mode and open-ended questions analyzed through content analysis. Results: The providers demonstrated an understanding of the benefits of patient portal use and its functions. It was found that although participants felt that their patients could benefit from this technology the portals were not used to their full extent. Conclusion: Health care technology has provided practitioners with the ability to improve patient outcomes. Strengthening the use of patient portals and increasing the quality of how they are used has the potential to enhance patient engagement in their care, ultimately improving patient outcomes.
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.titleProviders' Perceptions and Current Knowledge About Patient Portal Use in a Primary Care Clinic in Wyomingen_US
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen
dc.contributor.committeememberDavis, Maryen
dc.contributor.committeememberPacheco, Christyen
dc.contributor.committeememberShea, Kimberlyen
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen
thesis.degree.disciplineNursingen
thesis.degree.nameD.N.P.en
refterms.dateFOA2018-06-25T04:02:14Z
html.description.abstractBackground: Chronic disease is a growing problem in the United States and in Wyoming. It is associated with increased costs and increased morbidity and mortality. Technologies such as patient health portals have been shown to improve patient outcomes. Objective: The objective is to promote future use of the patient portal as a tool to improve chronic disease management by identifying opportunities to increase their use. Design: Using quantitative methodology, a 38-item survey was created to examine primary care providers' preexisting knowledge, attitudes, practice facilitators and barriers about patient portal use and chronic disease management. Setting: A nurse owned primary care clinic in central Wyoming Participants: Four nurse practitioners. Measurements: The survey responses and Likert-type questions, analyzed the mode and open-ended questions analyzed through content analysis. Results: The providers demonstrated an understanding of the benefits of patient portal use and its functions. It was found that although participants felt that their patients could benefit from this technology the portals were not used to their full extent. Conclusion: Health care technology has provided practitioners with the ability to improve patient outcomes. Strengthening the use of patient portals and increasing the quality of how they are used has the potential to enhance patient engagement in their care, ultimately improving patient outcomes.


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