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dc.contributor.advisorDraugalis, JoLaine R.en
dc.contributor.advisorReed, Thomas C.en
dc.contributor.authorMance, Jessie Jean
dc.date.accessioned2017-07-03T17:51:10Z
dc.date.available2017-07-03T17:51:10Z
dc.date.issued2006
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/624608
dc.descriptionClass of 2006 Abstracten
dc.description.abstractObjectives: To assess perceived efficacy and patient satisfaction at a single point in time during a course of therapy with a compounded topical formulation containing at least ketoprofen in an anhydrous gel base. Methods: Patients aged 18 and older, currently using one of the topical pain relief compounds of interest obtained from Reed’s Compounding Pharmacy in Tucson, Arizona were recruited and then interviewed (in person or by telephone) for this study. Data collected during patient interviews were recorded on a form designed solely for the purposes of this study. Interview questions pertained to the nature of the participant’s pain, their assessment of their pain both before treatment with the medication of interest and at the time of the interview, frequency and duration of patient use of the pain relief gel, disclosure of any other pain relief medications the patient was using at the time, and their overall satisfaction with the medication. Results: Interviews were conducted with a total of 50 patients with chronic pain conditions representing several different etiologies and anatomical locations. The average pain assessment score at the time of the interview (representing perceived patient pain after use of the topical pain relief compound) was significantly lower than the average before treatment pain assessment score (p<0.001). After treatment with the gel had commenced, perceived pain scores dropped by average of 3.56 units (SD 2.28), or 44%. Increased frequency of application of the topical pain relief gel was not associated with greater pain relief or changes in overall patient satisfaction with the product. A longer duration of use of the topical pain relief was also not associated with greater pain relief or overall patient satisfaction with the product. Whether or not a patient utilized other pain relief medication(s) while undergoing treatment with the topical pain relief gel had no bearing on the assessment of their pain either before use of the gel or at the time of interview. The average overall patient satisfaction with the topical pain relief compound was rated at 6.6 out of a possible 10 units (SD 3.13). Thirty-six patients (72%) rated their satisfaction with the topical medication of interest with a satisfaction score of ≥ 6, 10 patients (20%) rated their satisfaction with a score of 10 (completely satisfied), and 6 patients (12%) rated their satisfaction with a score of 0 (not at all satisfied). It was observed that the lower the perceived pain assessment score at the time of the interview (after using the gel), the greater the patient satisfaction with the product. Additionally, patients were observed to be more satisfied with the product if the difference between their perceived pain assessment scores (before and after) was greater (i.e.: greater patient satisfaction with greater pain relief). Conclusions: Treatment of chronic pain with a topical pain relief compound containing at least ketoprofen in an anhydrous gel base is associated with patient satisfaction and perceived analgesic benefits. During the one-time interview, most patients reported a significant improvement in their pain relief, and the great majority of patients were very satisfied with the compounded topical treatment they received from Reed’s Compounding Pharmacy.
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author.en
dc.subjectTopical Pain Reliefen
dc.subjectChronic Painen
dc.subjectKetoprofenen
dc.subject.meshChronic Painen
dc.subject.meshPain Managementen
dc.subject.meshKetoprofenen
dc.titleTopical Pain Relief Management: Assessment of Patient Satisfaction with A Novel Compound Containing at Least Ketoprofenen_US
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Reporten
dc.contributor.departmentCollege of Pharmacy, The University of Arizonaen
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item is part of the Pharmacy Student Research Projects collection, made available by the College of Pharmacy and the University Libraries at the University of Arizona. For more information about items in this collection, please contact Jennifer Martin, Associate Librarian and Clinical Instructor, Pharmacy Practice and Science, jenmartin@email.arizona.edu.en
html.description.abstractObjectives: To assess perceived efficacy and patient satisfaction at a single point in time during a course of therapy with a compounded topical formulation containing at least ketoprofen in an anhydrous gel base. Methods: Patients aged 18 and older, currently using one of the topical pain relief compounds of interest obtained from Reed’s Compounding Pharmacy in Tucson, Arizona were recruited and then interviewed (in person or by telephone) for this study. Data collected during patient interviews were recorded on a form designed solely for the purposes of this study. Interview questions pertained to the nature of the participant’s pain, their assessment of their pain both before treatment with the medication of interest and at the time of the interview, frequency and duration of patient use of the pain relief gel, disclosure of any other pain relief medications the patient was using at the time, and their overall satisfaction with the medication. Results: Interviews were conducted with a total of 50 patients with chronic pain conditions representing several different etiologies and anatomical locations. The average pain assessment score at the time of the interview (representing perceived patient pain after use of the topical pain relief compound) was significantly lower than the average before treatment pain assessment score (p<0.001). After treatment with the gel had commenced, perceived pain scores dropped by average of 3.56 units (SD 2.28), or 44%. Increased frequency of application of the topical pain relief gel was not associated with greater pain relief or changes in overall patient satisfaction with the product. A longer duration of use of the topical pain relief was also not associated with greater pain relief or overall patient satisfaction with the product. Whether or not a patient utilized other pain relief medication(s) while undergoing treatment with the topical pain relief gel had no bearing on the assessment of their pain either before use of the gel or at the time of interview. The average overall patient satisfaction with the topical pain relief compound was rated at 6.6 out of a possible 10 units (SD 3.13). Thirty-six patients (72%) rated their satisfaction with the topical medication of interest with a satisfaction score of ≥ 6, 10 patients (20%) rated their satisfaction with a score of 10 (completely satisfied), and 6 patients (12%) rated their satisfaction with a score of 0 (not at all satisfied). It was observed that the lower the perceived pain assessment score at the time of the interview (after using the gel), the greater the patient satisfaction with the product. Additionally, patients were observed to be more satisfied with the product if the difference between their perceived pain assessment scores (before and after) was greater (i.e.: greater patient satisfaction with greater pain relief). Conclusions: Treatment of chronic pain with a topical pain relief compound containing at least ketoprofen in an anhydrous gel base is associated with patient satisfaction and perceived analgesic benefits. During the one-time interview, most patients reported a significant improvement in their pain relief, and the great majority of patients were very satisfied with the compounded topical treatment they received from Reed’s Compounding Pharmacy.


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