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dc.contributor.authorAvanesians, Patrick
dc.contributor.authorDaroch, Giancarlo A.
dc.contributor.authorFleming, John
dc.contributor.authorHundt, Stephen A.
dc.contributor.authorLeake, Steven C.
dc.contributor.authorOjha, Lujendra
dc.contributor.authorSternberg, Ben K.
dc.contributor.authorWampler, David F.
dc.date.accessioned2017-07-05T23:21:00Z
dc.date.available2017-07-05T23:21:00Z
dc.date.issued2011-05-14
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/624628
dc.description.abstractTransient Electromagnetic (TEM), Controlled Source Audio Magnetotellurics (CSAMT), Gravity, and Magnetic data were collected in the Tucson Mountains during the Spring semester, 2011. The goal was to investigate the extent of a low-resistivity porous sedimentary layer and faults that may form potential traps located under the surface volcanic layers, as interpreted by Lipman 1993. The sedimentary layer under the volcanics has the potential to be used for either water resources or compressed air storage to store solar energy. The results from the TEM and CSAMT surveys broadly correlated with the thickness of the volcanic layer and throw of the faults interpreted by Lipman, 1993. The gravity modeling suggested the faults may have a larger throw than what was indicated by the other methods. Because of the fundamental uncertainty in the densities to use in the modeling, it was concluded that the gravity modeling may not give as accurate a prediction of the structure in this region. For further investigation of the deep porous sedimentary layer, we suggest that TEM and CSAMT are the most effective methods.
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherLASI Laboratory for Advanced Surface Imaging, The University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ)en
dc.relation.ispartofseriesLASI-11-1en
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.lasi.arizona.edu/en
dc.rightsCopyright © Arizona Board of Regents
dc.subjectGeology -- Arizona.en
dc.subjectGeophysics -- Arizona.en
dc.titleGEOPHYSICAL INVESTIGATION OF THE TUCSON MOUNTAINSen_US
dc.title.alternativeGeophysics Field Camp 2011en
dc.typeBooken
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Arizonaen
refterms.dateFOA2018-09-11T21:06:57Z
html.description.abstractTransient Electromagnetic (TEM), Controlled Source Audio Magnetotellurics (CSAMT), Gravity, and Magnetic data were collected in the Tucson Mountains during the Spring semester, 2011. The goal was to investigate the extent of a low-resistivity porous sedimentary layer and faults that may form potential traps located under the surface volcanic layers, as interpreted by Lipman 1993. The sedimentary layer under the volcanics has the potential to be used for either water resources or compressed air storage to store solar energy. The results from the TEM and CSAMT surveys broadly correlated with the thickness of the volcanic layer and throw of the faults interpreted by Lipman, 1993. The gravity modeling suggested the faults may have a larger throw than what was indicated by the other methods. Because of the fundamental uncertainty in the densities to use in the modeling, it was concluded that the gravity modeling may not give as accurate a prediction of the structure in this region. For further investigation of the deep porous sedimentary layer, we suggest that TEM and CSAMT are the most effective methods.


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