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dc.contributor.authorKomacek, Thaddeus D.
dc.contributor.authorShowman, Adam P.
dc.contributor.authorTan, Xianyu
dc.date.accessioned2017-07-06T22:57:49Z
dc.date.available2017-07-06T22:57:49Z
dc.date.issued2017-01-31
dc.identifier.citationAtmospheric Circulation of Hot Jupiters: Dayside–Nightside Temperature Differences. II. Comparison with Observations 2017, 835 (2):198 The Astrophysical Journalen
dc.identifier.issn1538-4357
dc.identifier.doi10.3847/1538-4357/835/2/198
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/624642
dc.description.abstractThe full-phase infrared light curves of low-eccentricity hot Jupiters show a trend of increasing fractional dayside-nightside brightness temperature difference with increasing incident stellar flux, both averaged across the infrared and in each individual wavelength band. The analytic theory of Komacek & Showman shows that this trend is due to the decreasing ability with increasing incident stellar flux of waves to propagate from day to night and erase temperature differences. Here, we compare the predictions of this theory with observations, showing that it explains well the shape of the trend of increasing dayside-nightside temperature difference with increasing equilibrium temperature. Applied to individual planets, the theory matches well with observations at high equilibrium temperatures but, for a fixed photosphere pressure of 100 mbar, systematically underpredicts the dayside-nightside brightness temperature differences at equilibrium temperatures less than 2000 K. We interpret this as being due to the effects of a process that moves the infrared photospheres of these cooler hot Jupiters to lower pressures. We also utilize general circulation modeling with double-gray radiative transfer to explore how the circulation changes with equilibrium temperature and drag strengths. As expected from our theory, the dayside-nightside temperature differences from our numerical simulations increase with increasing incident stellar flux and drag strengths. We calculate model phase curves using our general circulation models, from which we compare the broadband infrared offset from the substellar point and dayside-nightside brightness temperature differences against observations, finding that strong drag or additional effects (e.g., clouds and/or supersolar metallicities) are necessary to explain many observed phase curves.
dc.description.sponsorshipNASA [NNX12AI79G]; NASA Headquarters [PLANET14F-0038]; NASA Headquarters; NASA High-End Computing (HEC) Program through the NASA Advanced Supercomputing (NAS) Division at Ames Research Centeren
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherIOP PUBLISHING LTDen
dc.relation.urlhttp://stacks.iop.org/0004-637X/835/i=2/a=198?key=crossref.354dc580b6d7ab8aac836a831df8421fen
dc.rights© 2017. The American Astronomical Society. All rights reserved.en
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
dc.subjecthydrodynamicsen
dc.subjectmethods: analyticalen
dc.subjectmethods: numericalen
dc.subjectplanets and satellites: atmospheresen
dc.subjectplanets and satellites: gaseous planetsen
dc.titleAtmospheric Circulation of Hot Jupiters: Dayside–Nightside Temperature Differences. II. Comparison with Observationsen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Arizona, Lunar & Planetary Laben
dc.identifier.journalThe Astrophysical Journalen
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en
dc.eprint.versionFinal published versionen
refterms.dateFOA2018-07-13T02:47:52Z
html.description.abstractThe full-phase infrared light curves of low-eccentricity hot Jupiters show a trend of increasing fractional dayside-nightside brightness temperature difference with increasing incident stellar flux, both averaged across the infrared and in each individual wavelength band. The analytic theory of Komacek & Showman shows that this trend is due to the decreasing ability with increasing incident stellar flux of waves to propagate from day to night and erase temperature differences. Here, we compare the predictions of this theory with observations, showing that it explains well the shape of the trend of increasing dayside-nightside temperature difference with increasing equilibrium temperature. Applied to individual planets, the theory matches well with observations at high equilibrium temperatures but, for a fixed photosphere pressure of 100 mbar, systematically underpredicts the dayside-nightside brightness temperature differences at equilibrium temperatures less than 2000 K. We interpret this as being due to the effects of a process that moves the infrared photospheres of these cooler hot Jupiters to lower pressures. We also utilize general circulation modeling with double-gray radiative transfer to explore how the circulation changes with equilibrium temperature and drag strengths. As expected from our theory, the dayside-nightside temperature differences from our numerical simulations increase with increasing incident stellar flux and drag strengths. We calculate model phase curves using our general circulation models, from which we compare the broadband infrared offset from the substellar point and dayside-nightside brightness temperature differences against observations, finding that strong drag or additional effects (e.g., clouds and/or supersolar metallicities) are necessary to explain many observed phase curves.


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