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dc.contributor.advisorBarham, Terryen
dc.contributor.authorLong, Wallace H., Jr.
dc.creatorLong, Wallace H., Jr.en
dc.date.accessioned2017-07-07T21:56:06Z
dc.date.available2017-07-07T21:56:06Z
dc.date.issued1983
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/624661
dc.description.abstractA common misconception in our understanding of the history of conducting stems from a failure to identify properly the origin of beat patterns. Berlioz's L'Art du chef d'orchestra, written in 1844, has long been accepted as the first major text to codify both the principles of conducting and the beat-patterns conductors have employed to facilitate communication with performers.The beat-patterns illustrated in L'Art du chef d'orchestre had actually been in existence for well over a century before Berlioz wrote about them. The present study will document the existence of beat patterns prior to 1844 and examine their influence on performance practice.
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.subjectlecture recital documenten
dc.subjectConductingen
dc.titleThe Development of Beat Patterns from 1672 -1763: An Historical Perspectiveen_US
dc.typetexten
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen
thesis.degree.disciplineMusicen
thesis.degree.nameD.M.A.en
dc.description.noteLecture Recital Document (Digitized from holdings at the Fine Arts Library, University of Arizona Libraries)en
dc.identifier.callnumber1982 LON
refterms.dateFOA2018-06-24T06:12:12Z
html.description.abstractA common misconception in our understanding of the history of conducting stems from a failure to identify properly the origin of beat patterns. Berlioz's L'Art du chef d'orchestra, written in 1844, has long been accepted as the first major text to codify both the principles of conducting and the beat-patterns conductors have employed to facilitate communication with performers.The beat-patterns illustrated in L'Art du chef d'orchestre had actually been in existence for well over a century before Berlioz wrote about them. The present study will document the existence of beat patterns prior to 1844 and examine their influence on performance practice.


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