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dc.contributor.advisorSlack, Marionen
dc.contributor.authorMarroquin, Cesar
dc.contributor.authorVirgen, Maria
dc.date.accessioned2017-07-17T18:14:03Z
dc.date.available2017-07-17T18:14:03Z
dc.date.issued2005
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/624757
dc.descriptionClass of 2005 Abstracten
dc.description.abstractObjectives: To describe the physical activity and nutrition status of pharmacy students and determine the level of knowledge that these students have related to prevention of obesity. Methods: This was a descriptive study of the physical activity and nutrition status of pharmacy students and their knowledge related to the prevention of obesity. Data were collected from all the students using a paper and pencil questionnaire (a copy is provided in the Appendix). Students were asked to answer questions related to causes of obesity, definition of obesity using BMI, and physical activity relating to BMI. They were also asked to compare physical activity to drug therapy and define the recommended exercise guidelines by the Institute of Medicine. Students were asked to match physical activities with the intensity of the activity from light to vigorous. Students were also asked to list the fruits, vegetables, unsaturated fats, sweetened drinks, fried foods, and whole-grain foods consumed the day prior. Students listed the frequency of moderate and vigorous activities they participated in the week prior. Students chose the benefits of physical activity most important to them and were asked to rank the importance of physical activity, diet and obesity prevention to their health. Demographic data were collected on age, gender, ethnicity, height and weight. Results: Scores were derived for all questions and mean scores for the three classes were compared using student’s t-test for all groups. Mean scores and student’s t-test were also used to compare responses between genders. Implications: Overall, pharmacy students are lacking education in preventing obesity. By educating pharmacists about healthy eating and physical activity they, in turn, can educate the public on preventing obesity.
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author.en
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
dc.subjectObesity Preventionen
dc.subjectPharmacy Studentsen
dc.subject.meshObesityen
dc.subject.meshStudents, Pharmacyen
dc.titleKnowledge of Obesity Prevention in Pharmacy Studentsen_US
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Reporten
dc.contributor.departmentCollege of Pharmacy, The University of Arizonaen
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item is part of the Pharmacy Student Research Projects collection, made available by the College of Pharmacy and the University Libraries at the University of Arizona. For more information about items in this collection, please contact Jennifer Martin, Librarian and Clinical Instructor, Pharmacy Practice and Science, jenmartin@email.arizona.edu.en
html.description.abstractObjectives: To describe the physical activity and nutrition status of pharmacy students and determine the level of knowledge that these students have related to prevention of obesity. Methods: This was a descriptive study of the physical activity and nutrition status of pharmacy students and their knowledge related to the prevention of obesity. Data were collected from all the students using a paper and pencil questionnaire (a copy is provided in the Appendix). Students were asked to answer questions related to causes of obesity, definition of obesity using BMI, and physical activity relating to BMI. They were also asked to compare physical activity to drug therapy and define the recommended exercise guidelines by the Institute of Medicine. Students were asked to match physical activities with the intensity of the activity from light to vigorous. Students were also asked to list the fruits, vegetables, unsaturated fats, sweetened drinks, fried foods, and whole-grain foods consumed the day prior. Students listed the frequency of moderate and vigorous activities they participated in the week prior. Students chose the benefits of physical activity most important to them and were asked to rank the importance of physical activity, diet and obesity prevention to their health. Demographic data were collected on age, gender, ethnicity, height and weight. Results: Scores were derived for all questions and mean scores for the three classes were compared using student’s t-test for all groups. Mean scores and student’s t-test were also used to compare responses between genders. Implications: Overall, pharmacy students are lacking education in preventing obesity. By educating pharmacists about healthy eating and physical activity they, in turn, can educate the public on preventing obesity.


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