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dc.contributor.advisorNikolich-Zugich, Jankoen
dc.contributor.authorCabel, Carly Roseen
dc.creatorCabel, Carly Roseen
dc.date.accessioned2017-07-27T18:12:44Z
dc.date.available2017-07-27T18:12:44Z
dc.date.issued2017
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/624933
dc.description.abstractThe topic of aging is widely discussed in the clinical setting, especially its little known distinction from frailty. Frailty, a syndrome, can be measured clinically using a set of parameters known as a Frailty Index (FI). Alongside the discussion of aging comes the topic of cytomegalovirus (CMV), a latent herpes virus that is contracted early and remains in the host until its death. This virus has been associated with many diseases with links to inflammatory problems, as CMV increases the inflammatory response. It is hypothesized that CMV also affects increased frailty in aging adults. To test this hypothesis, two groups (n=15) of mice, one infected with MCMV and one naive, were studied under a clinical frailty index for 13 months. We monitored the overall changes to the T cell compartments in the two groups by flow cytometric analysis of naïve and memory populations. Further, the size of the CMV-specific immune response was tracked by assessment of T cells specific for 3 viral proteins (M45, M38, and m139). These parameters were compared in individual mice against their increasing frailty index scores over the lifespan. We found no relationship between CMV infection, the magnitude of the CMV-specific T cell response, and frailty.
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.titleAssessing MCMN Infection as a Driver of Clinical Frailty in Aging Miceen_US
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
thesis.degree.levelbachelorsen
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen
thesis.degree.disciplineMolecular and Cellular Biologyen
thesis.degree.nameB.S.en
refterms.dateFOA2018-09-11T21:46:39Z
html.description.abstractThe topic of aging is widely discussed in the clinical setting, especially its little known distinction from frailty. Frailty, a syndrome, can be measured clinically using a set of parameters known as a Frailty Index (FI). Alongside the discussion of aging comes the topic of cytomegalovirus (CMV), a latent herpes virus that is contracted early and remains in the host until its death. This virus has been associated with many diseases with links to inflammatory problems, as CMV increases the inflammatory response. It is hypothesized that CMV also affects increased frailty in aging adults. To test this hypothesis, two groups (n=15) of mice, one infected with MCMV and one naive, were studied under a clinical frailty index for 13 months. We monitored the overall changes to the T cell compartments in the two groups by flow cytometric analysis of naïve and memory populations. Further, the size of the CMV-specific immune response was tracked by assessment of T cells specific for 3 viral proteins (M45, M38, and m139). These parameters were compared in individual mice against their increasing frailty index scores over the lifespan. We found no relationship between CMV infection, the magnitude of the CMV-specific T cell response, and frailty.


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