Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorLacasse, Cherylen
dc.contributor.authorFuentes Quintero, Jacqueline
dc.creatorFuentes Quintero, Jacquelineen
dc.date.accessioned2017-07-27T21:35:39Z
dc.date.available2017-07-27T21:35:39Z
dc.date.issued2017
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/624988
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this thesis was to explore best practices for prevention of nurse compassion fatigue and burnout within the first year of pediatric oncology nursing practice. The oncology population has the highest use of palliative and end of life care services compared to any other field clinical population (Hughes & Smith, 2014). Within the pediatric oncology population, 58% of the Children’s Oncology group has a palliative care team, and this has also been on the rise (Hughes & Smith, 2014). Palliative and end of life care encompass the transition from a curative to a palliative approach which causes many nurses to face ethical dilemmas regarding the decisions for the patient’s care. Nurses play a major role within the interprofessional team as a care coordinator and patient and family advocate during critical transitions in care. A new nurse in this role, however, can have difficulty with the duties and responsibilities of the care due to challenging patient care decisions, which can lead to compassion fatigue and burnout within the first year of practice. Through a literature search, fifteen articles were chosen for inclusion of this thesis, from which three evidence-based interventions were developed. Implementing educational workshops, high- fidelity simulations, and bereavement debriefing sessions would provide first year pediatric oncology nurses with the knowledge background and with organizational support necessary for the demanding field.
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.titlePreventing Compassion Fatigue and Burnout Among First Year Pediatric Oncology Nurses: Best Practicesen_US
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
thesis.degree.levelbachelorsen
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen
thesis.degree.disciplineNursingen
thesis.degree.nameB.S.N.en
refterms.dateFOA2018-09-11T21:50:59Z
html.description.abstractThe purpose of this thesis was to explore best practices for prevention of nurse compassion fatigue and burnout within the first year of pediatric oncology nursing practice. The oncology population has the highest use of palliative and end of life care services compared to any other field clinical population (Hughes & Smith, 2014). Within the pediatric oncology population, 58% of the Children’s Oncology group has a palliative care team, and this has also been on the rise (Hughes & Smith, 2014). Palliative and end of life care encompass the transition from a curative to a palliative approach which causes many nurses to face ethical dilemmas regarding the decisions for the patient’s care. Nurses play a major role within the interprofessional team as a care coordinator and patient and family advocate during critical transitions in care. A new nurse in this role, however, can have difficulty with the duties and responsibilities of the care due to challenging patient care decisions, which can lead to compassion fatigue and burnout within the first year of practice. Through a literature search, fifteen articles were chosen for inclusion of this thesis, from which three evidence-based interventions were developed. Implementing educational workshops, high- fidelity simulations, and bereavement debriefing sessions would provide first year pediatric oncology nurses with the knowledge background and with organizational support necessary for the demanding field.


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Name:
azu_etd_hr_2017_0062_sip1_m.pdf
Size:
940.3Kb
Format:
PDF

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record